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on 1 January 2016
Even though it focuses on the incident which eventually got him to serve a prison sentence for an on the field incident, this book tals well about the journey of Duncan Ferguson. Duncan is often misunderstood because of his truculence and his image. What we find is a man aware of his image and wants to keep a majority of life private. Of course I want to know more about his blooming relationship with Wayne Rooney and that is not the books premise. Well researched from start to finish. Interesting to read about Jim McLean, what a character. He seems.
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on 14 September 2014
This is the story about a remarkable and widely misunderstood man. Worshipped by Evertonians, hated by the media, this is a non-judgemental story of his life so far. I finish this book with the feeling that we are going to hear more of Duncan Ferguson, the legend will continue.
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on 25 July 2017
Enjoyed the book a good read .
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on 18 June 2017
greatbook
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on 26 June 2017
Great service and better product
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on 25 October 2014
Great recommendation from graham spiers. Not what I expected at all, couldn't put it down.
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on 18 August 2017
A good read a bit hard in places but overall a good read
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on 4 July 2015
The question is how do you write a biography about a football player who with only rare exception almost never spoke in public or to the press? The answer is with painstaking forensic detail, which is exactly what author Alan Pattullo does with his examination of one of the Premier Leagues most enigmatic, mysterious and outrageous players, Duncan Ferguson.

Ferguson was too often dismissed by fans and press alike as no more than a thug in a football shirt, but his role in the history of football and specifically in the history of Everton football club is much more significant than that. People forget that for a year he was Britains most expensive footballer, and although this was in a somewhat pre-internet era this news still generated a wave of national interest.

Dont forget that Ferguson could also play. At times he was the very definition of 'unplayable' and could terrorise opposition defences - although the word 'unplayable' when associated with Ferguson is often accompanied by a cautionary 'on his day', and Fergusons motivation (or often lack thereof) are explored in detail in the book.

And yes, Fergusons discipline problems are also explored in minute detail, from his numerous red cards, the the on the field issue that lead to him being the first player to be imprisoned for an action that occurred during a game, to his numerous previous criminal offences, his conflicts with fellow players and coaching staff, and the conflict he had with the Scottish Football Association that eventually saw him turn his back on the national game. Its all here.

I'm struggling to think of a better researched book involving of footballer than this one. Pattullo covers every aspect of Fergusons life and career, managing to search out family, child hood friends, the staff who coached him in the junior game and coaches and players at all of his former clubs, amongst many other sources, as well as analysing much of what was said in the press about him and gathering the few nuggets that Ferguson himself spoke in public all in one incredibly detailed, informative and educating tome.

This is a must for any Evertonian of the era, as well as any general football fan keen to learn about one of the most enigmatic players to grace the British game.
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on 28 September 2017
Heavy going, repeated constantly, slow. Does pick up a bit in the middle but there's nowhere near enough about big Dunc.
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on 29 September 2014
I was one of those Evertonians who saw Dunc as a hero in his first spell at the club and as a waste of money in his second. I bought the tshirts when he was imprisoned and attended a freezing cold reserves match to watch him following his release. Everton desperately needed a hero when he arrived but were saddled with an injury-prone player who had cost a fortune by Everton standards. It was only after he retired in 2006 that Everton were again able to contemplate spending the sort of fee they had spent to bring him back in 2000. It was the softening of my harsher opinion on him, through finding out a few of the 'nicer' things about Dunc, and the side of him that could be called being 'a softie, that made me interested in this book. Overall, I'm probably fairly neutral when it comes to judging Dunc and I feel this book is fair to him.

The author has spent a long time working on this and you can see where his time has been spent. He has spoken to a whole host of people from every stage in Duncan's career and there's a surprising amount of content about his time in Barlinnie. The real surprise is an interview that takes place in Finland. The off-pitch misdemeanours all get mentioned and the majority of the on-pitch ones along with a number of heated discussions with managers. The one omission is detailing the times he was harshly treated. I think mainly of the time Paul Durkin sent him off at Leicester for 'use of an elbow' when the defender had headed the back of his head and was prepared to testify to that effect. The FA weren't interested. Another ref told his linesman to 'keep an eye on him' but seemed to miss everything certain other players did.

The book is very accurate. Just a minor mistake relating to Everton's record in penalty shoot-outs and another one concerning Collina coming out of retirement to to do his dirty work in 2005.

There are one or two amusing quotes attributed to Dunc and, yes, that picture of Steffan Freund is included.
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