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on 9 October 2000
I loved this book. It is the first time that we meet Ramses as an adult and see something of the character that he will become, especially bearing in mind the interaction with the other 'young people'. The story is typically intense, and is a jolly good read. In fact, with the development of her characters first glimpsed in this book, Peters has turned a new page in Amelia's chronicles and they just go on getting better from here.
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Elizabeth Peters was born and brought up in Illinois and earned her Ph.D. in Egyptology from the University of Chicago's famed Oriental Institute. Peters was named Grand Master at the inaugural Anthony Awards in 1986 and Grand Master by the Mystery Writers of America at the Edgar Awards in 1998. She lives in a historic farmhouse in western Maryland.

The Amelia Peabody books may or may not be an acquired taste, personally I love them. They are set in Victorian times when there were still very strict rules of etiquette and polite behaviour was the norm. Although most of the books are set in Egypt, in the desert under very trying conditions and extremely hot weather the `English' way of life was still expected to be adhered to, sometimes with quite hilarious consequences.

Amelia Peabody is Elizabeth Peters' best loved and brilliant creation, a thoroughly Victorian feminist who takes the stuffy world of archaeology by storm with her no nonsense dress sense and forthright opinions.

Once again Amelia Peabody and her family return to their beloved Egypt. They are excited that they have a license to excavate a tomb in the spot that all archaeologists would love to dig, the Valley of the Kings. However they are not working on the exciting find of a new tomb but on clearing one that has already been opened. Emerson is approached by an American, Colonel Bellingham, to come to work for him, but Emerson works only for himself and is not slow in telling the Colonel this. To complicate matters the Colonel's daughter, Dolly needs someone to chaperone her and sets her sights on Ramses (in this book Ramses, Nefret and David are at the young adult stage).

The family is also passed a note warning them to stay away from a tomb that does not exist. Amelia and Emerson realise that there may be a hidden tomb, as the note suggests. Eventually their search brings them to the tomb and it contains a mummy. But this is no ancient Egyptian. This person had died and been mummified in the last decade . . .
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This book takes us back to Egypt in 1903, with another cracking Amelia Peabody Murder Mystery. Previously I have reviewed another of Elizabeth Peters books, The Last Camel Died at Noon, in which there was a plethora of rather recalcitrant camels. In contrast, this book is riddled with cats. Now, please don't get the impression that this is a book about cats, as it is not, but they do feature rather heavily. For lovers of these books I have to forewarn you that the cat Bastet has been accompanied by Styx to the other side. Never fear, there is a replacement who is just as full of character.

So preliminaries over, what about the book. Amelia Peabody is an aristocratic Englishwoman who is married to an archeologist. She herself is not only an archeologist, but an amateur sleuth. Wherever, she goes she always manages to trip over a dead body. In this book she, her husband, and a large cast of family members discover a new tomb. Funnily enough there is a body inside. This leads to another jolly good jape, full of murder, intrigue and mysterious characters. All the characters are well represented and, of course, given the time and place, exotic. I could picture them perfectly. In many ways the characters are caricatures and larger than life, yet somehow realistic. A difficult trick to pull of but Elizabeth Peter's manages it.

The plot is excellent with a number of red herrings and side turns. This kept me reading, and turning just one more page. The sign of a good murder mystery. This is top notch book which I can highly recommend.
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TOP 500 REVIEWERon 29 January 2014
Amelia & family are back in Egypt excavating lesser known tombs but, as usual, their path is strewn with crime. This is a fun read with the children having more prominence than before and an easy way to pass a few hours.
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on 14 December 2013
I am mad about Egypt and its history and to have such wonderful characters and animals just makes its perfect. I have them all on my Kindle and woud now like tohave the actual books as I would read them again.
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Elizabeth Peters was born and brought up in Illinois and earned her Ph.D. in Egyptology from the University of Chicago's famed Oriental Institute. Peters was named Grand Master at the inaugural Anthony Awards in 1986 and Grand Master by the Mystery Writers of America at the Edgar Awards in 1998. She lives in a historic farmhouse in western Maryland.

The Amelia Peabody books may or may not be an acquired taste, personally I love them. They are set in Victorian times when there were still very strict rules of etiquette and polite behaviour was the norm. Although most of the books are set in Egypt, in the desert under very trying conditions and extremely hot weather the `English' way of life was still expected to be adhered to, sometimes with quite hilarious consequences.

Amelia Peabody is Elizabeth Peters' best loved and brilliant creation, a thoroughly Victorian feminist who takes the stuffy world of archaeology by storm with her no nonsense dress sense and forthright opinions.

Once again Amelia Peabody and her family return to their beloved Egypt. They are excited that they have a license to excavate a tomb in the spot that all archaeologists would love to dig, the Valley of the Kings. However they are not working on the exciting find of a new tomb but on clearing one that has already been opened. Emerson is approached by an American, Colonel Bellingham, to come to work for him, but Emerson works only for himself and is not slow in telling the Colonel this. To complicate matters the Colonel's daughter, Dolly needs someone to chaperone her and sets her sights on Ramses (in this book Ramses, Nefret and David are at the young adult stage).

The family is also passed a note warning them to stay away from a tomb that does not exist. Amelia and Emerson realise that there may be a hidden tomb, as the note suggests. Eventually their search brings them to the tomb and it contains a mummy. But this is no ancient Egyptian. This person had died and been mummified in the last decade . . .
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on 4 May 2015
The Amelia books always deliver. The stories combine , Archeology, Adventure, intrigue and occasionally romance. It is good to see the family grow and mature. It is almost like they are members of your own family and you watch with delight the development of their lives.
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on 4 July 2012
the book is an adventure story set in the early 20th century. The atmosphere of the British ruling classes in Egypt at that time is well portrayed. The book is also humourous with Amelia Peabody a larger than life figure and her family are excentric and loverble at the same time. This is an adventure story full of intrigue and suspense. I couldn't stop reading.
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TOP 500 REVIEWERon 26 August 2005
... and one of my personal favourites. Ramses is 16 and suddenly sexy, and gets pursued by a range of different women. Catherine is introduced as a medium and the personal shenanigans which ensue almost squeeze out the mystery. Excellent - and watch out for Ramses' sleight of hand at the end!
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on 12 July 2011
ALLL THE AMELIA PEABODY BOOKS ARE ORIGINAL AND UNUSUAL. WHILST MAINTAINING YOUR INTEREST THEY WILL NOT CAUSE YOU TO LOSE SLEEP AND THEY LEAVE YOU FEELING CHEERFUL.
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