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Customer reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars
8
The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Nightdress
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on 30 November 2013
A re-read for me i'm going through the whole series again since reading Downturn Abbey. Paul Howard is definitely one of the best writers to have come from Ireland. His ear for voices and accents translates amazingly well into print and the hilarious situations Ross manages to find himself in always make me laugh out loud. Amazing.
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on 12 July 2015
A challenging read; it made really made me appreciate how difficult it was for my dyslexic son manage to get through his education. I wish I had some of his tenacity!
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on 6 June 2014
I love this. I really want to live his life, he is so funny. I just find it hard to put these books down
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on 20 January 2015
Excellent reading - very witty as wth the whole series.
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on 22 January 2006
The genetic engineers have finally found a purpose in life. By mixing the DNA of Bertie Wooster, Harry Flashman and Adrian Mole and sending him to a Dublin school for the overprivileged, they have come up with Ross O'Carroll Kelly.
Written like the great novels of Dickens, in weekly instalments published in the Sunday Tribune, the stories really come together when published in book form. The Curious Incident is the fifth of the series, each one of which is as compelling as the last. As soon as you put it down, you want to get rid of the book - in case having it around makes some of its magic poison (also known as Eau d'Affluence) rub off on you.
One does sense that Mr Howard occasionally sickens of his creation and would like to get rid of him by throwing him off a waterfall in Switzerland. But he's a pro. Instead of doing him in, he takes wilder leaps of imagination and has now created the monster that is Ronan. Utterly unbelievable, yet now central to the stories, this eight-year-old crime boss has entered the world of RO'CK and it is hard to imagine life without him. What next? Will it transpire that Fionnuala grew up on a halting site?
Ross may appear too localised to export, although I have seen him on the shelves in Waterstones in London. But it's only a matter of time before somebody published a glossary for the Brits and the Ozzies, so that they can love him as much as we do at home. It's a fair bet that he will never be understood in the US.
One thing is for sure. In a generation's time, the PhDs in "Anglo Irish literature", as it appears to be known, will not be written about the turgid writings of Banville or Toibin. Ross will still hold sway in the colleges, but not propping up the bar talking about what a ledge he was on the schools rugby field. Roysh?
And you have simply got to get hold of Ross's Twelve Days of Christmas. It's, like, OH migod.
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on 6 June 2007
I read the entire Ross O'Carroll Kelly series in 5 days - all laugh out loud hilarious, and a scarily accurate portrayl of the D4, dube wearing, OC emulating spawn of affluent Southside Dublin. Ross is less a fictional caricature, more a novelised embodiment of the Rugby following classes.

As with all books in the series, The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Nightdress is a quick and easy read. Our narrator, Ross, is a loathsome yet oddly endearing creature - he continously cheats on his girlfriend-cum-wife Sorcha, both her bridesmaids being among his conquests (one of whom is the brides sister), and treats his parents with vehemently vocal disdain.

In the closing of the last book, Ross's wedding reception is ruined by the revelation that, not only is he father of a 7-year old 'skobie' child, but his parents paid off the childs family to keep this a secret; And thus the character Ronan (or Roh-nin)is born. And this, for me, is where the series falters. Granted, what we are reading is a satire, and the character of Ronan is an exaggerated representation of a working class, 'Northsoy-id' child (street smart, old before his time), but the idea of a smoking, drinking, 'boird' chasing 7 year old who has the respect of gangland criminals is beyond ludicrous.

Saying that, it's hard to otherwise find fault with the book, although the readership would likely be limited to those from or familiar with Dublin and its stereotypes.
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on 11 March 2012
Things never go smoothly for this character. However we as readers
are once again treated to a hilarious account of his life's adventures.
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on 22 December 2005
This book continues the saga of Ross and his turbulent social life. Having been born in Dublin myself, then attended a private school, and then gone to college in Trinity, this book really hits home. If you have a similar bakcground, you will know all of the stereotypes in the books. Its very, very funny-and sometimes hits far too close to the bone. I lent this to a friend who is dating a Ross-alike and she thought it was funny-and didn't get the ironic streak that runs through Paul Howard's writing. Definatly buy it-if you're from Dublin
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