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First released in 2006, this is the fourth episode of a of the first standalone series for Paul McGann's Eighth Doctor outside of the monthly range of Big Finish releases. This is a one disc release, with a single 50 minute episode. There are some interviews with cast and crew at the end of the disc.

Following the rather fun release `Horror of Glam Rock', this episode in the Eighth Doctor's adventures has a slightly darker and more serious tone. Which is fine, as Paul McGann can do dark and serious very well. Eight and Lucie land on a mountain top next to pair of lovers about to commit suicide. Things don't go to plan, and pretty soon all four are in the custody of what appear to be the gods Zeus and Hera. It soon becomes clear that the immortal Gods immortality is the result of some morally obscene practices, and the Doctor vows to stop them.

Ian McNeice guests as Zeus, devious, cunning, morally bankrupt and a dirty old man at heart. Elspet Grey is Hera, just as devoid of humanity. Lucie is starting to have her eyes opened to the depravity that exists in the wider universe, where Eight is appalled but no longer surprised at the depths people will plumb. He and Lucie are turning into one of the great TARDIS crews, quite a relief after Eight was lumbered with C'Rizz in the main range. I am rather enjoying the characterisation of Eight in this series, sometimes we get glimpses of his original tiggerish self, and sometimes it is his gloomier personality that dominates. But having the mixture of the two rather than one or the other is proving to be a great aspect of the series, and Paul McGann does it excellently.

It's a well produced, thought provoking production that still has room for a bit of fun and some adventure. 5 stars.
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Another forty five minute long audio adventure for the eighth doctor who and his fiesty companion lucie miller. Paul Mcgann and sheridan smith who play the duo are an excellent pairing, and their chemistry together is a treat to listen to.

In this story they arrive on an alien world just in time to stop two young lovers from carrying out a suicide pact. The world is ruled by humans who claim to be the greek gods. And they have a dark secret, which ensures they survive and prosper. How will the doctor and lucie deal with this? And do they have the right?

This is like the best star trek episodes, in that it presents the listener with a moral dilemma, and you are forced to draw your own conclusions about it at the same time as the characters in the story do. The cast also includes Ian McNiece as Zeus, who turns out to be a wonderful vocal talent and has some great scenes with the two leads.

It all leads to quite a satisfying conclusion to a very good story. There are elements of the plot that will be familiar to people familiar with the greats of literary science fiction, but this is a fresh and interesting take on them.

The disc is finished off with several interviews with cast members, which are nothing special but worth listening to
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VINE VOICEon 4 September 2009
The Doctor and Lucie appear on a mountain ledge as a pair of young lovers are about to commit suicide. Lucie, acting as our proxy (which is what all good companions must do) quickly makes comparisons with Romeo and Juliet, though we soon find that much more sinister things are afoot!

The twist to the story revolves around the use of illegal alien technology for personality transfer and a cavalier attititude to the rights of clones to live (or not). All the way through the Doctor is placed in the position of being outraged at the approach to immortality taken by the upper echolons of this planet, whilst at the same time being comfortable in his own very extended lifetime.

There is also the love story between both the young lovers and 'Zeus' and 'Hera' of whom they are clones whose love has lasted over a 1000 years.

The resolution is more subtle than normal - the Doctor ends up having to work the machines to imprint Zeus over his clone yet the process fails and the cycle ends up broken. What isn't clear is has the Doctor deliberately done this or did the ageing machine (another nice touch - an immortality machine that is, itself, not eternal) fail?

Did the situation require the Doctor to resolve it or not?

Why only four stars - only the deep sense of deja vu from a listener who has read too many sci-fi works to be wholly surprised. Make up your own mind!
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on 5 January 2013
The story is fantastic and very Doctor Who indeed. Everyone's roles are played fantastically so lose yourself in it today. The CD itself arrived in excellent condition- no scratches, no breakages and no faults. Enjoy!
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on 8 November 2015
Another enjoyable romp with the 8th Dr and Lucy. A tender if not rather obvious ending.
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on 12 March 2015
EXCELLENT STORY AND VERY WELL ACTED. 10/10.
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