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on 18 March 2014
Rather disappointed very little flying or operational details mostly about what the author and his mates got up to in between flying,A few interesting facts but overall boring.
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on 6 November 2015
This book attracted some criticism because it did not dwell on the actual combat flying of the author. However, I thought it was this very aspect that made the book so enjoyable for me. There is a cornucopia of books about the cut and thrust of aerial combat, but none of them so delightfully and comprehensively covers the day to day lives of the pilots between sorties - their liaisons with the local lasses, the pranks they played, the characters they worked with, the Del Boy schemes some of them got up to, the clapped out old cars they had, the crash landings they had for really crazy reasons, their experiences in hospital, and much more. The war was a way of life, not 6 years of 24/7 hands on the trigger, as so many people would like to believe. The author has a great sense of whimsy and a light-hearted writing style that I particularly enjoyed. The stories in this book ring true for me in many ways because my father was radio/radar groundcrew on SAAF Mosquitos in Africa and Italy. His favourite story was about having to abandon his workshop after an overladen USAAF Mustang P51B decided to fly right through it on a poorly judged takeoff - fortunately nobody was hurt, but the workshop was demolished. This book is full of stories of similar ilk.
Night Fighter over Germany is a book that should appeal to readers of both genders and a wide range of ages.
Heartily recommended as an enjoyable and chuckle-rich read!
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on 2 December 2008
This book should be called what I got up to during the war. Very little aviation information or factual flying experiences and is more about where he went and what pubs he frequented and what high jinx they got up to. Just pays lip service to raids.The most disappointing book I have ever read and needs to be in the biography section not aviation history
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on 3 May 2016
At first I thought I didn't like the authors writing style, it seemed flippant and like he was trying to be "over-funny". There seemed little information about night flying a night fighter and I couldn't get a handle on the book. However, I persevered and I'm glad I did! It began to dawn on me that this was EXACTLY like the people who did this job. They took it, the job, very professionally and seriously, or they died. But they took life itself as a light hearted escapade to be enjoyed for what it was, a beak from imminent death.

In the end I found I had more respect and admiration for all who go into combat. They really do deserve our thoughts and prayers. I gave it 5 stars because of this and because I did find it a good read, once I'd discovered the initial misconceptions were mine and not the fault of the book. If you want a more scholarly account with facts and figures look elsewhere, but if you want to find about about the people who did these things, read on!
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on 5 August 2014
Before buying this book I read some of the reviews that were quite negative. From the title you would expect more details of the action over Germany but the book is really about the authors experiences. Once I realised that I found the book a joy to read. Enjoyable life story without the expected fight. Well written with some comical passages that did draw me into the authors life experiences.
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on 1 February 2014
A really good read of the life of a RAF night fighter pilot during the latter stages of WW2 although the training and operational flying descriptions are good as is the discription of squadron life I feel that the actual flights over Europe are lacking in content however lacking in action. I thought that this book would compliment night fighter by c f rawnsley and Robert wright
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on 4 February 2014
This highly entertaining book is packed with memories of flying "The Wooden Wonder". Often humorous and equally tragic it shows us a glimpse of the way things were. I think anyone with an interest in WW 2 would enjoy this read as it highlights many things a more traditional history of the Mossie misses out.....
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on 15 April 2009
An excellent story of the authors' life in the RAF. Humour in large doses, pleasingly understated heroics in the air, and above all a tale of life with a group of like-minded individuals with a common goal (whether that might be a certain mission, pub or WAAF). The book creates a vivid picture of station life in those days; the laughs, the tears, and the events. Well worth a read.
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on 13 February 2015
Really interesting book, written in plain language. It explains the authors career as a nightfighter pilot from training to demob in great detail. The reader gets a complete insight into the day to day life of crews on operational squadrons during wartime. Brilliant!
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on 13 January 2016
This is a largely unknown story of the specialist mosquito crews in the war - a tale embargoed for many years after the war was finished. The author is clearly not a professional writer but he has a story to tell. His style is very RAF - I know from 20 years of living on RAF camps. It is a bit of an acquired taste and some of the attitudes that come through are, to put this kindly, dated. Even so, the book is atmospheric, capturing a time in history that is astonishing. Ordinary men taken out of context and put to do heroic work. Some failed but many just dug deep and got on with it. Read it for that atmosphere and better understanding what the war meant to the common man. This is not self serving war stories from an Algernon or Bertie full of "whizz bang tally ho" nonsense. This is the real thing.
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