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on 15 May 2007
Jaime Vegas (necromancer) hopes taking part in a television programme which intends to raise the ghost of Marilyn Monroe will lead to her being offered a show of her own. However, before that can happen she finds out the gardens of the house she is staying in hold a far nastier secret. Jaime calls on her fellow supernaturals for help - Jeremy Danvers the alpha werewolf and Eve Levine her contact on the other side. It quickly becomes apparent that something evil is at work and Jaime may need to push herself and her powers farther than she's dared to before.

I freely admit I am a huge Kelley Armstrong fan and this book doesn't disappoint. Jaime is perhaps one of my favourite characters, maybe because with her insecurities she is the most human of the supernaturals we have met in the Otherworld.

Her relationship with Jeremy is touching and believable and takes a big step forward here. He, the alpha werewolf who gives no outward signs of his feelings and Jaime who almost seems to overflow with emotion at times. I have been looking forward to them appearing in a book together ever since it became apparent how she felt about him and I think the relationship works beautifully.

Kelley Armstrong's characters are always a delight to read, every one an individual with their own motivations, quirks, fears and desires. As a bonus they also talk like real people - not just like characters in a book. (My favourite one-liner being Eve's sock puppet reference towards the end of the story.) We also get a sneak peek at how Marsten and Hope's relationship has been developing, which makes me look forward even more to the next book.

Some readers may question the presence of Lucas and Paige as they do seem slightly superfluous to the storyline. However, Savannah is necessary to the plot and without her adoptive parents it would be harder to explain why she suddenly appeared. So I can understand why they are included, though they don't appear to contribute much to the story.

If you've not read the previous six books this is a pretty accessible entry in the series. Though there are references to characters and events from previous books the main plotline is pretty much standalone. Bitten remains my favourite Otherworld book, but No Humans Involved definitely makes my top three. And I'm already looking forward to Book 8.
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on 3 June 2007
I couldn't decide whether to give this book 3 stars, or 4. I settled on 4, finally, and this is why:

This book was a bit disappointing for me, a huge fan of Armstrong's Otherworld novels. The characters are believable despite their near invincibility, and you quickly grow to love them. I really find myself caring what happens to each and every character beyond each book, and I look forward eagerly to each new release.

But this book doesn't quite make it to Armstrong's usual standards. Jaime's voice seems weaker than I remember it. Maybe this is because part of Jaime's charm is deeply ingrained in how OTHERS see her, not how she sees herself, so you lose a great deal of that when Jaime is speaking in the first person as she does throughout this book. For me, this meant that some of Jaime's appeal was missing and, although the plot is incredibly engrossing, I couldn't quite relax into the book as much as I had with the others. I also felt that Jeremy seemed a little out of character from how he is portrayed in the other novels. A lot of this could be argued away by pointing out that it's the first time we really see him away from the Pack and without his 'Alpha face' on but I'm not quite convinced this is all there is to it.

Despite these minor misgivings, the book still deserves 4 stars for the fast paced plot and captivating twists and turns. Unlike many of the other women in these books, Jaime doesn't have super strength, or the ability to defend herself with magic. Her powers aren't showy, and most of the time they're not even useful, but in this novel Armstrong makes Jaime stand just as powerfully and just as ethereal as the other women. We get an insight into necromancy that has only been touched on before, and, despite how human Jaime seems in almost every way, she reminds everyone, even Jeremy the werewolf Alpha, that her power is the darkest, dangerous one around.

I really enjoyed the manner in which this book concluded and, although I was just a *little* disappointed, I am looking forward to other novels by Kelley Armstrong, as she is still the best writer of supernatural fiction alive today, in my opinion.
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on 30 May 2017
Excellent read, love the series, books I can read over and over again and enjoy every time, the characters are well written that they come to life
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on 1 September 2011
It was nice that jamie got her own book and that she finally got some alone time with jeremy.it was a great addiction to the otherworld series.
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on 10 May 2007
I enjoyed this book, as I have every other book in the series. Jaime is actually a lot more interesting than I expected, and she even surprised me in the final climactic scenes. One of the themes in Kelley Armstrong's Otherworld Series is the actual humanity and everyday ordinariness of her extraordinary characters. Because Jaime's power was always so passive and her narratve voice is so normal, when she actually utilised her powers aggressively I was taken aback. And thrilled. There's nothing like a kick-ass heroine to elevate a paranormal book into cult classic status (hence I think the overwhelming appeal of Armstrong's most popular heroine Elena Michaels).

It was nice that Jeremy also got his moment in the spotlight, although some of the scenes made me feel a bit embarrassed. Not because I'm prudish, but in the other books Jeremy occupied a 'parent' role where the protaganists were concerned, and to suddenly read about him in romantic-hero mode (with all that entails) was a bit icky. But I got over it, and the details aren't as graphic as some other books in the same genre.

This book also guest-stars Hope Adams, which was very welcome. Here's a character I can't wait to read more of, and as the next book is all about her, I say roll on!
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on 7 May 2007
Jaime Vegas is a woman who works hard for what she wants, and she's on the cusp of realizing all of her ambitions. She's got a good handle on her career, and her love life is...well....lets just say things are finally starting to look up.

The book opens with Jaime agreeing to participate in a television reality show with two other up-and-coming celebrity spiritualists. She's not thrilled about it, but she sees the program for what it is: an opportunity to land her own series. It all seems easy enough, until Jaime becomes aware of something more troubling than the run of the mill spectral encounters she's used to. Lurking around in the backyard of the house where the show is set, something dark and frightening is vying for Jaime's attention. With questions piling up and answers making themselves scarce, Jaime turns to friends for help in solving this most unusual of mysteries. With werewolf Jeremy Danvers at her side, Jamie travels from L.A, to Chicago, to Portland and back all in an effort to make sense of a ghostly puzzle. Along the way, she bargains with a dark witch, trades quips with a demon, and enlists the protection of an unlikely angel. But she'll need more than supernatural allies help her understand what is slowly beginning to look like a very 'human' crime.

Jaime's come a long way since her debut in Armstrong's 'Industrial Magic', and her voice in this new book is sassy, sexy and fun. Though she's got a few hang-ups to overcome, she's a definite contender when it comes to taking care of business. This book sees Jaime coming to terms with her checkered past and the darker side of her supernatural abilities. Readers will also be delighted by Jeremy's strong presence in 'No Humans Involved'. The dark, notoriously self-controlled Pack alpha has always been something of an enigma and it's nice to be getting a small peek into his mind (and yes, heart) at last.

A reviewer below mentioned that this book was novella-like in length. This is most certainly NOT the case. This seventh book in the Otherworld saga is definitely a full length novel, and one of the best in the series. It's got humor, intrigue and a number of genuinely chilling moments. A definite must-read.
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on 3 September 2017
This is the seventh book in this series and the first one that centres around Jaime, the celebrity necromancer. Jaime has been a side character in several of the previous books, and we know from those books that she has a little bit of a crush on Jeremy, the alpha of the werewolf pack. Although this is the first book to centre Jaime as the main character, it is not what I would call a stand alone. There is far too much back story that has gone on in previous books, in order to appreciate this story to it's fullest I'd recommend the series is read in the correct order. That way you can fully appreciate the dynamics between all the characters.

In this book Jaime lands a gig in L.A. on a tv show about spiritualist mediums attempting to contact the dead. Jaime is the real deal though, and it soon becomes apparent that there are spirits at the house the show is set in, and they need her help.

Jeremy has headed to L.A. to assist Jaime in her investigation. I really enjoyed seeing the closed-off and uptight Jeremy let loose a bit. He's a bit of an enigma of a character, hard to read, so I enjoyed seeing a bit more of him as a more central character and see him away from the responsibilities as alpha of the pack.

I raced through this book, probably quicker than any of the other books in this series that I've read up til now. I couldn't put this one down. Jaime isn't my favourite heroine of this series, although I am very fond of her, but I found her story really gripping.

I'm excited to see where this series is going, I really like this group of paranormals and this author's storytelling is addictive.
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on 9 May 2007
This is the seventh book in Kelley Armstrong's Women of the Otherworld series, and it brings another of those women to the fore. Jaime Vegas is a "celebrity" spiritualist taking part in a TV show, but she is also a genuine necromancer, and she needs all her powers to deal with the ghostly mystery she finds here. With help and support from characters already familiar to fans, including a werewolf, a half-demon and an angel, Jaime must discover how humans have managed to achieve the impossible.

Jaime has featured as a supporting character before, but it is always interesting when such a character takes centre stage for the first time and we get a better understanding of them. The presence of werewolf Jeremy also affords the reader new insight into his character.

The length of this book has been mentioned by other reviewers. No Humans Involved is definitely full novel length (a typical novel being 100,000 words and NHI weighing in at approx 110,000 words). I too read it quickly, but this is down to the fast pace of the writing and the intrigue of the story and not to a short word-count.

This series is one of my favourites, and a new addition is always easgerly anticipated. I was not disappointed. No Humans Involved is a fun, exciting and intriguing read.
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VINE VOICEon 5 August 2007
I must say that I disagree with other reviews who say Jaime comes over weaker than in the other books. I think this story gives her a chance to shine, rather than being the 'show' necro of Industrial Magic. There were hints in that book of her being more thoughtful, and this book fills that in in Armstrong's usual fast paced style.

The developing romance with Jeremy Danvers is also well written. Despite being the Alpha, I have always felt there is a lot about Jeremy and his story which is not explained. Some of that is covered in this book. I can't wait to see what happens to the Pack dynamics when he does as he suggests he will to Jaime. It is also an interesting twist that Karl Marsten is now Pack, and the implications that his embryonic relationship with another character have on potential future storylines. I really hope there is also a story featuring the twins, Kate and Logan. Just imagine the fun of them starting school, given their reaction to the fluffy bunnies that Jaime sends them!

Eve and Kristof's return adds to the ghosts side of it, and I have to agree with Eve in terms of the Fates reaction to what has caused Jaime to seek her help. The continuing 'bleeping out' of Eve when she tries to mention anything from the other side is also amusing.

As with the other stories, there is sufficient development of the other characters that the series is unlikely to run out of steam. It is also good to see a series that does not rely on graphic sex to keep the (alleged) plot running. This only goes to show what a quality author Kelley Armstrong is.
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on 26 May 2007
Jaime Vegas (necromancer) hopes taking part in a television programme which intends to raise the ghost of Marilyn Monroe will lead to her being offered a show of her own. However, before that can happen she finds out the gardens of the house she is staying in hold a far nastier secret. Jaime calls on her fellow supernaturals for help - Jeremy Danvers the alpha werewolf and Eve Levine her contact on the other side. It quickly becomes apparent that something evil is at work and Jaime may need to push herself and her powers farther than she's dared to before.

I freely admit I am a huge Kelley Armstrong fan and this book doesn't disappoint. Jaime is perhaps one of my favourite characters, maybe because with her insecurities she is the most human of the supernaturals we have met in the Otherworld.

Her relationship with Jeremy is touching and believable and takes a big step forward here. He, the alpha werewolf who gives no outward signs of his feelings and Jaime who almost seems to overflow with emotion at times. I have been looking forward to them appearing in a book together ever since it became apparent how she felt about him and I think the relationship works beautifully.

Kelley Armstrong's characters are always a delight to read, every one an individual with their own motivations, quirks, fears and desires. As a bonus they also talk like real people - not just like characters in a book. (My favourite one-liner being Eve's sock puppet reference towards the end of the story.) We also get a sneak peek at how Marsten and Hope's relationship has been developing, which makes me look forward even more to the next book.

Some readers may question the presence of Lucas and Paige as they do seem slightly superfluous to the storyline. However, Savannah is necessary to the plot and without her adoptive parents it would be harder to explain why she suddenly appeared. So I can understand why they are included, though they don't appear to contribute much to the story.

If you've not read the previous six books this is a pretty accessible entry in the series. Though there are references to characters and events from previous books the main plotline is pretty much standalone. Bitten remains my favourite Otherworld book, but No Humans Involved definitely makes my top three. And I'm already looking forward to Book 8.
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