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Customer reviews

4.2 out of 5 stars
18
The Stone Canal: A Fall Revolution Novel (Fall Revolutions)
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on 31 January 2001
I've just finished re-reading this novel and no, I was right, this is one of the best books I've read for ages.
This is a brilliant mixture of political philosophy, nanotechnology, people-as-software and a dozen other superb ideas.
This was the first of Ken MacLeod's books that I read and is much stronger than any of his others.
Highly recommended.
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VINE VOICEon 15 November 2009
I bought this book based on the recommendations here.

Not sure if its the same book - iy takes forever (1/2 the book) to get a decent story going and the Sci-Fi is interspersed with a made up political story on eart that frankly has so many holes in the daft plot a fleet of Volvo Juggernauts passed through side-by-side.
That ruined the books for - the actual part in space was good; but the ending was a wet limp rag.

The stone canal of tthe name is just that, a stone canal with water in it. Tedious.

I'm going to have to think very carefully before ordereing another of this authors books, this read like a schoolchild's english essay.

Dissapointed.
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on 23 June 1999
The Stone Canal has a far wider scope than MacLeod's debut, The Star Fraction. There are two threads to the novel, set centuries and light-years apart; in one thread, MacLeod expands on Star Fraction's vision of the near future, tracking an uneasy friendship from Edinburgh University in the 1970s to the end of the characters' lives towards the end of the 21st century. The second thread, set on a distant planet some centuries into the future, sees these two characters resurrected in the form of clones. New Mars is not in our solar system and eighty percent of its inhabitants are sentient machines - a very different environment from turn-of-the-century London, and this uneasy friendship therefore takes on a very different form...
I found this novel a great improvement over Star Fraction - MacLeod's writing skills have certainly developed, and the human characters are rendered in a far more realistic manner (I found Moh Kohn, the main character in Star Fraction, to be little more than a communist Case). The juxtaposition of the modern-day storyline with the far future is most effective, though if you aren't interested in the politics of the future you may find the novel a little tedious. I myself find MacLeod's politics fascinating, and his exploration of how advanced technology, electronic intelligence and space colonisation will affect the political climate of the 21st century is far more authentic than many other authors who deal with the same themes (ie John Barnes, Neal Stephenson etc). Unfortunately MacLeod hasn't yet learned how to seriously grip a reader in the same way as his friend Mr I M Banks, but it would be unfair to expect that much of him. MacLeod's work stands on its own two feet, and very effectively at that!
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on 21 August 2017
very pleased
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on 3 October 2003
Best Scifi/cyberpunk book i've read since Neuromancer .In this book the Author has combined many popular theories for creation and technology such as exotic theories in physics and current technological trends to create an enthralling story . There are a lot of suprises , twists and some irony - enough to keep some of the most hungry bookworms consumed for a day or so ! Very , very recommmended .
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on 25 March 2000
Non-stop from 20th century left-wing politics all the way through to wormholes and such.
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on 24 March 1999
In Stone Canal Ken MacLeod again returns to his future vision of England. A awespiring book which combines the best features of science fiction: robots, gadgets, hope, despair and wonder. Truly a writer to watch for the future.
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on 22 November 2009
Well thought out and written, not his best but worth reading if you are into near future scifi
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