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on 22 June 2017
An incredible journey: to think that he traveled on his own into the interior of an unknown area, knowing that his predecessor had dies trying. Goes from gentleman to prisoner to pauper and still ploughs his way through life with inspiring trust and optimism. An honest view of slavery and Islam: Ultimately, it's not the religion that makes unsocial behaviour but pure human choice. I loved every page.
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on 22 March 2017
Useful tip - don't travel in North Nigeria.
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on 15 August 2017
book is ok.Thank's
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on 9 March 2017
very interesting
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on 10 May 2004
This book is Mungo Park's account of his journey into the interior of Africa, at a time (1795) when due to disease, etc. it was pretty much inaccessible to Europeans. I was grabbed from the first chapter which describes his entry into an exotic and alien land. The book tells how he had his possessions and even his clothing stolen, how he was imprisoned by the Moors and somehow found the strength and courage to keep going and eventually returned to Britain. The book does not dwell on his hardships unduly, however, but also describes the people he meets and their daily life and the environment in which they live. Generally his tone is detached and non-judgemental with regard to both Africans and Europeans alike (with the noticeable exception of the Moors). At the end of the book, the sad details of Park's second journey to Africa are also included. I had to read this for an Open University course, and I am so grateful that I was given the opportunity, as this is the best travel book I have ever read.
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on 10 August 2004
The book was written just after 1797 and so does not flow like a modern book, but it is an amazing story and if you read between the lines it gives a great insight in to western Africa before the westerns changed things for ever.
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on 2 February 2016
Couldn't hold my interest
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on 14 September 2009
A story of a 24 year old Scotsman, who was recruited to explore the source and direction of flow of the River Niger, by the well known scientist, Sir Joseph Banks of the African Association. This was in 1794 at the time when the slave abolition movement was gathering momentum. I knew Park carried out what was an epic voyage of discovery and later died in Africa before the age of 30 but in circumtances that are still uncertain. Much has been written about him but he never achieved the status of other great African explorers from Britain such as Livingstone, Stanley and Burton. This is supposedly Park's own words and he emerges as a remarkably resourceful and brave young man with an empathy for the people he meets on his journey. It is clear that someone has edtited his chapters especially those relating to slavery that was far more widespread than many of us realise. It is a story that deserves to be re-visited at this time when there is interest again in Britain's role in the slave trade and the Abolition Act, as well as our role as Empire builders in the Victorian era.
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on 20 January 2010
This diary of Mungo's venture into the interior of Africa is a joy to read.

His voice is suprisingly modern, not at all what I expected. The work bridges the centuries in a way that is reminiscent of that of Boswell's London diaries.

It is a rare chance to share in the exploration of a new, and then, undiscovered continent.

Buy this book!
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on 25 October 2009
A great book, which is simultaneously a fantastic adventure and insightful anthropological study. I would certainly recommend it to anyone interested in West African culture and/or who is planning to travel in Senegal, Mali or Mauritania. Particularly fascinating is the comparison between the Mali of 200 years ago and that of today.
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