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4.6 out of 5 stars
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4.6 out of 5 stars
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It had to happen sooner or later... While many fans criticised the last few volumes for dragging a bit, volume 11 sees events spiral out of control very quickly - and it's as gory & dramatic as it deserves to be. The Homelander enacts his plan; the Boys publish all the dirt they have on the Supes; Butcher & his crowbar meet up with The Homelander for a frank exchange of views; there's an unexpected twist; and a lot of people die.

Since it all comes to a head, it feels like the end. But apparently there's a volume 12 still to come, which deals with the aftermath of this very Ennis-like gore-fest.

If you haven't liked the last couple of volumes, I'd recommend picking volume 11 up anyway. This is a satisfyingly OTT, HD-Dolby-CGI conclusion (part 1) which really delivers. In places it's felt like a long journey but the destination makes it utterly worthwhile.
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on 13 July 2012
While the last couple volumes of The Boys has felt like Garth Ennis dragging his heels, suddenly with Volume 11 he decides to get everything over and done with in one big dump. It feels like dumping because there's no finesse to it, it just feels like Ennis throwing everything at the reader saying "There, it's done, happy now?". The increasingly crazy Homelander finally snaps and all pretence that the Supes are good guys is gone thanks to The Boys uploading everything they have on them over the last several decades onto the internet. Which is good because that's where the series was headed anyway, at least now the story has decided to move forward and at a brisk clip too.

There are moments where I couldn't help but sighing at the tediousness of it all: Hughie and Starlight are still doing their "we got problems" relationship dance, then Hughie begins whining again about The Boys being too violent - I just wish they'd get rid of him now - and Frenchie and the Female do their a**-kicking routine. So far, so ordinary. Where the story picked up was the final third when Butcher walks alone into a confrontation with Homelander - yes! With HL being the most powerful supe, how was Butcher going to defeat him? Well, I won't spoil the surprise but the results are, naturally, gory.

And then it's over. Sort of. There's an epilogue that'll be Volume 12 but it seems like the series is about done. Was it everything I'd hoped? Well, it's the best volume since Volume 6, mostly because the series has found its footing once again after a few (unnecessary) diversions and gotten to the meat. But it took its time to get there and I feel the overall series has suffered because of this. That and Darick Robertson sitting out the penultimate book of the series he co-created, but hopefully he'll return for the finale. "Over the Hill With the Swords of a Thousand Men" (excellent title) is decent, the ending saves it, but it feels like the series had more potential than what it ended up becoming which is slightly disappointing.
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on 1 March 2016
Each instalment of this series leaves you wanting more, looking forward to re-reading this over a long weekend in the summer sun.
believable characters is the key to the story, once you suspend you disbelief to include supes in your world you really can't expect the reader to then buy into unrealistic characters as well or ridiculous plot driving events just to get to the money shot.
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on 8 November 2012
The long anticipated confrontation with the Seven is here, and a few surprises are thrown in for the fun of it.

The series has been building to this showdown from the get go, but you never realise how much Butcher wants this until vol 3 when we realise there is some serious history, and then there is a gradual build in tension from vol 3 onwards, exploding in vol 7 Innocents, but then you start to feel that maybe they are just dragging the story out with an entire vol for Butcher's past, which is a typical poor East End boy with a **** for a dad, and a dear old mum, and a woman who makes him sane with the understanding that he'll go off the rails without her, surprise surprise she is killed by a baby that is from when she was raped by ??? (you realise who in vol 1). From vol 7 we get back ground stories on Butcher, Mallory, and we even get to see Hughie's home town, which also takes up a whole vol. (annoying I know). But finally it is here, what we have been waiting for from the moment The Homelander drops the family that were in the car who he flew into the air before speaking to the rest of the Supes about taking power.

Sadly I didn't enjoy it as much as I had hoped, and that is nothing against the writing, because you can't make something how everyone had hoped it would end. The only reason I felt this way is because I had been trying to think of how this might end for the last few months, and got in my head something different (I won't bore you with it, but it was a longer fight, and more explosions, shoot me I'm male and love a good fight). The confrontation is good, and I can't fault the storyline as we realise now how powerful Vought is, Hughie is confronted with a face he has been trying to avoid, but Butcher forces the confrontation for personal reasons, which I think will be important in the final vol. out Jan 2013.

This vol. is a great read, many characters reveal their true colours, and we watch Frenchie and the Female do what they do best while Hughie and Butcher confront the Homelander as the Supes gather to take power. I can't help but congratulate Garth Ennis for an amazing storyline, which I hope won't be made into a film because it just won't be good enough.
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on 26 November 2012
The series is back on track with this volume.

I have almost given up a couple of times but now I am looking forward to the end with confidence.

It now feels like the climax might actually have the impact that we expect and that the ending is going to be unexpected and take us someplace new, matching The Preacher. Roll on the finale!!!
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on 14 July 2012
While the last couple volumes of The Boys has felt like Garth Ennis dragging his heels, suddenly with Volume 11 he decides to get everything over and done with in one big dump. It feels like dumping because there's no finesse to it, it just feels like Ennis throwing everything at the reader saying "There, it's done, happy now?". The increasingly crazy Homelander finally snaps and all pretence that the Supes are good guys is gone thanks to The Boys uploading everything they have on them over the last several decades onto the internet. Which is good because that's where the series was headed anyway, at least now the story has decided to move forward and at a brisk clip too.

There are moments where I couldn't help but sighing at the tediousness of it all: Hughie and Starlight are still doing their "we got problems" relationship dance, then Hughie begins whining again about The Boys being too violent - I just wish they'd get rid of him now - and Frenchie and the Female do their a**-kicking routine. So far, so ordinary. Where the story picked up was the final third when Butcher walks alone into a confrontation with Homelander - yes! With HL being the most powerful supe, how was Butcher going to defeat him? Well, I won't spoil the surprise but the results are, naturally, gory.

And then it's over. Sort of. There's an epilogue that'll be Volume 12 but it seems like the series is about done. Was it everything I'd hoped? Well, it's the best volume since Volume 6, mostly because the series has found its footing once again after a few (unnecessary) diversions and gotten to the meat. But it took its time to get there and I feel the overall series has suffered because of this. That and Darick Robertson sitting out the penultimate book of the series he co-created, but hopefully he'll return for the finale. "Over the Hill With the Swords of a Thousand Men" (excellent title) is decent, the ending saves it, but it feels like the series had more potential than what it ended up becoming which is slightly disappointing.
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This volume reprints issues #60-#65. If you have been reading previous volumes, then you will know what to expect - sex, violence, swearing and conspiracy theory, though the conspiracy is actually far from theory. This is the book for anti-superhero comic readers. It is the penultimate volume, and there are several loose ends left loose at the end. I haven't seen the previous volume to this one, so there may be things set up there that have an effect on the story here. However, the Homelander`s superhero coup finally begins, though it may not be his coup after all, as we discover the secret of the Black Noir and that Voight-American's fail safe plan is not so safe. This is a Garth Ennis comic, so the U.S. Marine Corps and Billy Butcher must make a last stand at the White House. The Boys also suffer casualties in the fight. If you have been following the series, then it is a 5-star episode; someone coming in from the outside will no doubt wonder what is going on and why there is so
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on 2 January 2013
This is the book that Boys fans had been waiting for. After the series went off the rails a little with the Hughie and Butcher spin-offs and the fairly pedestrian (by this series high standards) volume 9. This sees the big showdown we had all been wanting to see for a while.
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on 11 July 2013
This is it, the showdown! You know there is going to be a lot of red ink in these pages and it doesn't disappoint. It won't play out like you expect though. There is a twist and it is up to you if you think it is clever or not. It has been a good ride and there is enough to chew on in the home straight.

The art is not Robertson but it is good. Plenty of effort goes into each page and there is a lot of red. And a lot of military hardware.

It feels like an ending although there is another volume to go so you don't have to start getting withdrawal just yet. Thumbs Up!
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on 24 July 2012
Ennis continues with his comic & abrasively clever pastiche of business, politics & the superhero genre.

Some spoilers below:

The politics of the Boys might be interpreted as Vought-American (generic multi$billion company) using the products it has to influence underlying public attitudes. Crucially how the Supes are presented to the public by Vought is a fiction, few of them behave like that in "reality". But the public attitudes Vought seek to influence by presenting their products in the way they do is key to getting Vought's stooges political power. Maybe Vought is the ultimate political lobbyist.

Homelander's story also boils down to him believing the fiction of what he thought he'd done & Butcher commenting: "It means you turned into a ******' psychopath by mistake."

Butcher, on the other hand, appears to have just enough self-awareness to realise without the sane influence of Hughie he'd be out of control as much as Homelander. Just as his brother, mother & wife gave him, Hughie offers the sanity he needs to control his psychopathic tendencies. Talking to Hughie has always been like talking to his sane self for Butcher but confronting him with A-Train was perhaps what he wanted to push his sanity over the edge to do what he wanted to do. At the end he apologies to his dead wife for what he did & will do.

I can understand why some fans don't like Hughie though, he's a bit like an irritating limiting influence on punishment for people considered to have transgressed in some way, somewhat like an irritating opposition to unwavering support of a summary death penalty, which will always have its hardcore fanatics, in both fantasy and reality.

The absurd Wildstorm-style posing of Paralactic was very funny & there's a very interesting historical/political inference in a single black&white photo that really made me laugh.
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