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on 23 April 2017
I first read this book in my mid teens (I'm surprised I can remember that far back but I do) and I remembered my encounter with Sara, and Blue et al very fondly. So yesterday I got a sudden urge to go and re-read Moonheart but rather than go and search the (very) many bookcases and boxes to find it I took the lazy path and just bought it again for my Kindle. It was worth it. Finished it today and am now going to go back and re-read Yarrow. I must admit that 30 years later it seems slightly out of kilter with so much smoking, and cassettes lol, but still a really genuinely great read, with many ideas that still seem fresh and exciting. I'm so glad I revisited this old friend.
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on 1 May 2017
As a fan of urban fantasy I've been meaning to read de Lint for years as he's one the originators of the genre and I finally got round to it with Moonheart, and I was not let down. This was an intriguing and involving read from the beginning. I particularly liked the multiple points if view it was written from. This is one if his early novels and some of the dialogue felt a bit clunky, but other than that I had no real complaints and I'm really looking forward to reading more of his books...
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on 30 October 1997
This was the first De Lint I discovered, and I still feel that it is his finest work. His adept blending of contemporary Ottawa, music, magic, Celtic mythology as well as Native beliefs are what give this book its multi-level appeal. This novel was my first foray into the "urban faerie" sub-genre of fantasy, and led me to a number of other fine novels. If you like De Lint, I would suggest: Tam Lin by Pamela Dean
War For the Oaks by Emma Bull
Waking the Moon by Elizabeth Hand
and the Borderlands Series by Terry Windling and Ellen Datlow.
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on 14 January 1998
In Moonheart, Charles de Lint proves himself to be one of the best urban fantasy authors. This book blends Celtic & Native American folklore with "real" life situations. The narrative grabs ahold of you from the onset and never lets go. The only regret I had was when I reached the last page of the book, and I realized I had reached the end. In all, it is one of my favorite all-time stories, and one that can, and should, be read time and time again without losing its magic or flavor.
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on 31 January 1997
As the first Charles De Lint book I discovered, Moonheart
turned De Lint into a favorite author of mine forever. His
characters are diverse and likeable, female characters are
never wimps, and he weaves mythologies of several cultures
together deftly.
I've been devouring books since I was a small child, and
my first taste of Moonheart sent me back to the bookstores,
special-ordering everything that could be acquired by De Lint.
If you enjoy fantasy fiction - the kind you can't put down,
Moonheart is a must-have!!
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on 16 June 2010
I really wanted to love this book, but sadly, I just couldn't. I think it might be because it uses Welsh myth: I grew up in Wales, and the flavour here just struck me as wrong. Somehow Welsh mythology gets a smell of Disney when you transport it to the USA or Canada. I don't know why. Perhaps because so many of the grimmer bits of Wales get left behind in transit.

The setting is Ottowa, and the protagonists are 'alternative thinkers' - by which the author mostly seems to mean agnostics or people of a mystical bent who are not Christian. A couple of 'conventional' relatives are mentioned and it's clear that these are Christians, in a very New World sense of the word. The fantasy elements are based on the fragments of pagan myth, if I have spotted them correctly, mostly via the Mabinogion.

So we've got this picture of on the one hand, the pagan celtic mystical world, and on the other, a sort of white picket fence 'normal' modern Christian world, and Never The Twain Shall Meet.

But nothing acknowledging 1600-odd years of Christianity in Wales, nothing recognising the Christian mystical tradition or Insular Christianity... There's an ring decorated with 'Celtic Ribbonwork' which the author clearly thinks of as pre-christian. But I can't help feeling the author is visualising it as something out of, say the Book of Kells, rather than La Tene.

The heroine is whimsical, with her green eyes and shocking failure to wear a smart skirt and makeup. I get it! Whimsical! Now stop banging on the contents of her desk and bookshelves, and get on with the story!

I just can't take pointy-eared elves playing drums seriously. I know it's a failing, but I just can't.
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on 16 July 1999
10 years ago, a friend handed me a copy of MOONHEART with the command, "Read this...NOW!" I did and I've been hooked on Charles deLint ever since. Some parts of his work makes me wonder if he has a magic window that lets him see into my life. Charles is also very kind to his fans and WILL respond to email as much as he is able, which makes him one of the really good guys. Looking forward to his next book, -Forests of the Heart-
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on 12 September 1999
This was the first ever Delint book I bought and I'm still not sick of reading it. This man is one of the few writers who take you along on a rythm into his tale. The writing is lyrical, taliesin is totty and the story is just plain magic. There are a lot of awfully clever ideas in here, the house spirit being just one of them. I particularly like the ordanairiness of the characters in oppose to some god awful black dressed vampire wanna be stumbling into a crypt at night and discovering elves after three spliffs and a pint, which is what some urban fantasy tends to be. if there was more stuff like this on the market, more books would sell.
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on 18 January 2000
I bought this book several years ago, and I think I've read it something like 20 times by now and have recommended it to countless friends. That should really say it all! The characters are wonderfully flawed and human, and there's more than enough twists to the tale to keep the reader well hooked. I recently lost most of my paperbacks in a flood; this will be the first one I replace.
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on 30 March 1999
Moon heart is one of those books that you simply cannot put down once you have picked it up. I completely lost track of time. The storytelling was so good and the worlds are blended with such ease that anything seems real. I have read a lot of books of this genre, but rarely one this good.
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