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VINE VOICEon 13 January 2013
I became a fan of Edgar Rice Burroughs while still at school over 50 years ago and have practically all his books in paperback. Now, with the kindle facility, it is a joy to have them in easy reach at any time. They are classics by a master writer, and although to modern eyes they may seem a little dated in style, Disney seem to have realised the fantasy appeal recently with their production, John Carter, based on A Princess of Mars.
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on 14 September 2013
I am rereading the series now I have the Kindle and found that the overblow style had dated a bit. Still enjoying them and this is well up to standard. Good aircraft read; not too much attention required.
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on 13 February 2009
"Thuvia, Maid of Mars" by Edgar Rice Burroughs is the fourth book in the Barsoom series, and it is quite a bit different than the previous books. The first three books focused on John Carter, and his love of Dejah Thoris, but they are barely mentioned in this book. Instead, the focus switches to focus on John Carter's son, Cathoris, prince of Helium, and the title character Thuvia, princess of Ptarth, both of which were introduced in the second book of the series "The Gods of Mars", but were fairly minor characters in both that and the third book of the series. This book was originally published in three parts in "All-Story Weekly" on April 8, 15, and 22 of 1916. It was later published in book form in October of 1920.

Most of the book deals with things with which the readers of the series are already familiar, such as the different kingdoms of Red Martians, and the warlike Green Martians, but there is one very interesting new development and that is in the ancient city of Lothar, and in particular the phantom bowmen who defend that city. The entire Lothar sequence is certainly the highlight of the book, with the unusual Jav, who is the first Lotharian they meet, and Tario, Jeddak of Lothar. Also, the character Kar Komak who is one of the phantom bowmen is a good addition to the cast of characters.

The story is rather simple. Cathoris is in love with Thuvia, as is Astok, Prince of Dusar, but Thuvia herself is already promised to Kulan Tith, the Jeddak of Kaol. Who Thuvia favors is kept somewhat secret, though the reader can pretty much guess. Astok is determined to have her, and so he kidnaps her and frames Cathoris in the process, hoping to start a war and prevent the truth from being learned. Cathoris falls into their trap, and he and Thuvia disappear from the known world. Cathoris does his best to protect Thuvia as she gets passed from captor to captor, while the circumstances of what is going on in their kingdoms is unknown to them.

This book falls short of the first books of the series for a number of reasons. Many of the devices used here were used before. One would think that so many plots and deceptions had taken place in the past, that it would not automatically work so easily in making people believe that Cathoris was a kidnapper. The fact is, though, that these hokey devices worked in the earlier books, because Burroughs did a much better job of keeping the action going and telling a complete story. This book is much shorter than any of the prior three, and the ending feels like it is cut at least a chapter short as only some of the issues raised during the story end up being resolved. One never really gets to know Kulan Tith, and so his actions in the end feel empty of significance, a mistake which Burroughs did not make in the earlier books.

For those who were content with the first three books, there isn't enough here to justify coming back to it, but for those who want more, it does add something to the series. I am only going to rate this one two stars, because I feel it is significantly weaker than its predecessors, but for those who are big fans of the series, you probably will still get something out of it.
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on 28 January 2013
To anyone who has not discovered Edgar Rice Burroughs books on Venus and mars I would recommend you try one . This series of books was written arround 1930 but the characters and animals encountered on the way just jump out of the page at you. Start with the first of the series A princess of mars on which the film Carter was based. Watch the film if you want an idea of what the books are like.
I have read these books since childhood and still re-read them in later life.
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It took the first three volumes of his Martian series for Edgar Rice Burroughs to get his hero John Carter, former cavalier of Virginia, and Dejah Thoris, princess of Helium to the point where they could live happily ever after. Satisfied with the combination of romance and pulp adventure, this fourth Martian novel turns to the next generation of Barsoomians. Cathoris, son of the Warlord of Mars and his beloved princess, is one of two princes and a Jeddak who are seeking the hand of the Thuvia of Ptarth. When she is kidnapped by the sinister Prince Astok of Dusar, the entire planet is about to be thrown into a bloody war and Cathoris has to follow in his father's footstep and deal with savage beasts and phantom armies as he rescues Thuvia and saves Barsoom from a costly war. Of course, by the time he catches up with his beloved, Cathoris finds the situation is slightly more complicated than he thought, mainly because ERB never provides a smooth ending for his couples.
"Thuvia, Maid of Mars" was originally serialized in "All-Story Weekly" in April 1916, which explains the novel's subtext about world war, since one was going on in Europe at that point in time. The original title was "Cathoris," but apparently when it was published as a novel in 1920 somebody wised up and changed it. Thuvia is not as great a name as Deja Thoris, but it is not bad. In many ways this is like the previous novel, "The Warlord of Mars," where the hero chases his beloved across the landscape of Barsoom and has to deal with green men and white apes. Fortunately, unlike ERB's Tarzan series, "Thuvia, Maid of Mars" is really the only time that repeats himself like this in the Martian series, which stands out as his best as he proves in the next and most inventive volume in the series, "Chessmen of Mars."
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It took the first three volumes of his Martian series for Edgar Rice Burroughs to get his hero John Carter, former cavalier of Virginia, and Dejah Thoris, princess of Helium to the point where they could live happily ever after. Satisfied with the combination of romance and pulp adventure, this fourth Martian novel turns to the next generation of Barsoomians. Cathoris, son of the Warlord of Mars and his beloved princess, is one of two princes and a Jeddak who are seeking the hand of the Thuvia of Ptarth. When she is kidnapped by the sinister Prince Astok of Dusar, the entire planet is about to be thrown into a bloody war and Cathoris has to follow in his father’s footstep and deal with savage beasts and phantom armies as he rescues Thuvia and saves Barsoom from a costly war. Of course, by the time he catches up with his beloved, Cathoris finds the situation is slightly more complicated than he thought, mainly because ERB never provides a smooth ending for his couples.
“Thuvia, Maid of Mars” was originally serialized in “All-Story Weekly” in April 1916, which explains the novel’s subtext about world war, since one was going on in Europe at that point in time. The original title was “Cathoris,” but apparently when it was published as a novel in 1920 somebody wised up and changed it. Thuvia is not as great a name as Deja Thoris, but it is not bad. In many ways this is like the previous novel, “The Warlord of Mars,” where the hero chases his beloved across the landscape of Barsoom and has to deal with green men and white apes. Fortunately, unlike ERB’s Tarzan series, “Thuvia, Maid of Mars” is really the only time that repeats himself like this in the Martian series, which stands out as his best as he proves in the next and most inventive volume in the series, “Chessmen of Mars.”
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on 13 January 2013
I last read 10 of these books on the Martian series over 40 years ago in my early teens. I got a kindle fire for Xmas and downloaded five including this one for free. I've read all five again and bought the next two. Easy reading and takes me back a long way.
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on 19 March 2009
Good, knockabout sword and (sort of) sorcery, with plenty of alien races to contend with. Fast paced action driven plot that skips over some simple holes, such as how Thuvia controls the banth, and how those ghostly armies are created, but the fantasy adds to the enjoyment.
This edition also has a glossary for the whole series, which includes a line about the writers servant, and a couple of spelling mistakes(mistaking Thuvia for Thuria on a couple of occasions), but makes for an enjoyable read.
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on 25 April 2013
I liked the book because I was interested in the historic science fiction as written by Edgar Rice Burroughs. The language though is archaic and might not suit everyone.
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on 3 June 2013
I cannot remember how far this is along the John Carter saga but it is true to form the pace is fast and is exciting to read
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