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on 30 January 2015
Gets words wrong in English eg. "Fleas do .." rather than "Please do..." and things "passed down through the apes.." rather than "through the ages." I wish I'd bought a better edition.
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on 29 March 2017
Really bad translation. Even the title is wrong Samurai and not samari!!!
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on 21 May 2017
Interesting insights.
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on 17 June 2017
Very good and quick service also to the Netherlands!
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on 2 November 2016
A good book ruined by obviously poor translation.
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on 17 May 2001
Hagakure may be familiar to anyone who has seen the film 'Ghost Dog'. It contains anecdotes relating to the way of the samurai, but can be (unfairly) summarised as follows: the way of the samurai lies in death, death must be contemplated on a daily basis, even the slightest example of disrespect should be met by immediate and fatal remedy. In particular, seppuku (hiri kiri) is the noble and glorious end to virtually all anecdotes.
It is a remarkable book, and probably the most interesting of the Samurai guides (eg Book of Five Rings). However, it should be remembered that Hagakure was considered exceptionally fundamentalist when it was written (17th century) and was disapproved of due to its overemphasis on death.
It was also a favourite text of Yukio Mishima, which if you know about Mishima, tells its own story.
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on 15 December 2000
As an Iaido practitioner I was first interested in this book for it's relation to the Samurai. However, the further I got into it the more I realised it can be of interest for anyone. Although the text is obviously rooted in the world of medieval Japan, it is easy to read between the lines and see the relevance it offers people today. That is not to say it is a philosophy as such, but that it offers a fascinating insight into a truly insightful and original mind.
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on 1 March 2004
Despite being written 300 years ago in Japan, this book contains so much wisdom and insight that can be successfully applied to modern life. It is very easy to read because it is made up of short passages usually only a paragraph long, so it is excellent to read a few pages at a time for a little inspiration. The stories are sometimes funny, and frequently confusing and illogical to the western mind which makes it a great read. This book is a great insight into the philosophy and mindset of the samurai. I would recommend it to anyone, and it makes a great gift.
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TOP 500 REVIEWERon 6 April 2010
The book is one of the samurai treatises but as opposed to some others in the same area, works a bit differently - it is a collection of thoughts, rather than a concise guide. The translator selected 300 out of the original 1300 and while most work well, it is hard to say if the complete set would make more sense.

In terms of content, a lot of the thoughts are very insightful, timeless and still relevant. His thoughts on event randomness looks a bit like a 300 year older Taleb (Fooled by Randomness: The Hidden Role of Chance in Life and in the Markets). On the other hand some of the other thoughts appear somewhat random, short, almost haiku-like.

Unlike the other samurai treatises I have read, Hagakure touches on more topics but brushes them more lightly - so yo will have thoughts on the role of the wife, upbringing of offspring and homosexuality.

While you can pick it up, open on a random page and read, like mentioned by other reviewers and therefore makes it good as a gift, I still much prefer Musashi Miyamoto's The Book of Five Rings. It might be more accessible to a Western audience, or it might be that the completeness and structure just works much better. I suppose if you have not read much samurai writing, The Book of Five Rings might be an easier initiation to the topic, too.
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on 3 May 2009
Hagakure is a truly exceptional book. It cuts straight and deep and finds the epitomy of the way of the Samurai.

In a truly masterful style Tsunetomo delivers food for thought and life values that properly digested, and with a bit of salt, can be of great use for your personal life or business.

I loved this book and suggest it both for the fans of Japanese culture, but also for those looking for insight in life deriving from the way of the Samurai.
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