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on 17 November 2009
A quick review to say that, while I love this book - I borrowed a very old copy and was really inspired by it, so decided to get the most up to date version - I sent this particular one back as it is missing a lot of what helped me in the previous editions.

It's a 'hard times' edition for the recession, and as such is streamlined and very practically focussed, with punchy chapters on e.g. interview advice, CVs etc. That may be just perfect for a lot of people but what I bought the book for was the really (for me anyway) helpful chapters that talk about what sort of thing you want to do with your life, with advice and exercises to help you think about your values and goals; just what I need at a time when i'm trying to re-think my career. In the 2010 edition this is largely absent, save for a brief chapter at the end, so it wasn't for me and i'll probably try and get the 2009 edition intead, but if you're looking for very practical jobhunting advice, this could be helpful - as long as you remember it's very US-focussed.
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on 27 March 2006
I've known about this book for years, but always disregarded it because I've been fortunate enough to do work that I love. I'm now with an HR consultancy that includes amongst its offerings outplacement programmes. As this is a new area for me I thought I should become familiar with the 'industry standard' - Parachute.
This is a brilliant book, not just for job-hunters; but for anyone who'd like to take stock of their career.
Bolles' 'life-changing job hunt' process is a well thought out, practical and effective methodology for finding a role that you love. It's best summed up using a metaphor he's borrowed from travel writers. They say: lay out all the clothes that you think you'll need and all the money you think you need to take. Now pack half the clothes and take twice the money. Bolles suggests taking all the information you think you'll need about the job market and all the information you think you'll need about yourself, and finding out half that information about the market and twice that information about yourself.
His writing style is homespun wisdom like that of Dale Carnegie. Given that Bolles has revised the book every year since 1970, and has sold over 8 million copies, I think he's entitled to some eccentricities. I think other reviewers' comments about his Christian views and his quirkyness are short-sighted. The conversational writing style reads like advice from a favourite uncle, and as with such advice, you don't have to take all of it.
The front cover says the 2006 edition is "stunningly revised". Not having seen any previous editions, I can't comment on what those revisions are, or whether they are stunning. I can comment on what I liked about the layout. Printed in red and black ink, the red is used for titles, subtitles and highlighting - much like you'd use a highlighter pen. I found much of the red highlights were exactly what I would highlight myself, so useful for future reference.
The book also contains dozens of old pen-and-ink drawings, the subjects of which don't seem to bear any relevance to the surounding text. They do serve to break up the 400-odd pages (which at first can look intimidating) and communicate something of Bolles' unique character, which is quite endearing. Don't take that to mean that this is an old fashioned book - far from it. This seventy-something author (I'm guessing) is perfectly at home writing about Coldplay, Blackberries and recent events like hurricane Katrina and the economic resurgence of China and India.
Whilst Bolles acknowledges his international readership, one slight disappointment is the US focus on all the web references. However, the overall content is excellent.
After some great context setting and research findings about job hunting, Bolles job-hunt methodology starts off, logically enough, by posing the question 'Where on Earth do you want to live?' He then works through the process to identify your favourite interests, people environments, working conditions, values, salary, level of responsibility and skills. Throughout, there are plenty of diagrams, exercises and grids to complete, to help you identify what you need to know (so I don't know what the '...Parachute Workbook' offers in addition to this).
There's a great section on 'Identifying Who Has the Power to Hire You for the Job You're Looking For', along with 'Ten Interviewing Tips' and 'Six Secrets of Salary Negotiation'.
Regardless of whether you're thinking of looking for a job or a career change NOW, this book is valuable for getting you thinking about all the possible career options you have ahead of you. If you are currently looking, I would say this book is far more valuable than all the 'Create a Great CV', 'Great Answers to Difficult Interview Questions' and 'How to do an Internet Job Search' books put together.
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VINE VOICEon 6 January 2016
I bought this book on the recommendation of a friend. My expectations of it were low. I thought it was going to be a jobs manual related mainly to the USA. How wrong I was.

This book addresses the task of finding a new job in such a detailed, thorough way that it could more properly be called a life review. In fact, the author suggests you do treat unemployment as a chance for a life review, and fully appreciates how hard that can be. It explains that few people nowadays can expect or get a 'job for life' - the average life of a full time job is between 1 and 5 years, and that's not just amongst the under 25s.

The book contains chapters that you could see in other job-hunting books, but possibly not all in one: How to find Hope, Seven Secrets about the Jobs Market Today, The Best and Worst Ways to Look for Jobs, Life/Work Planning - Planning a Campaign of Attack, Understanding Yourself, Social Media, Five Ways to Change Career, CV Tips, How to Deal with Problems on Your CV, Starting Your Own Business.

The book really excels at statistics - explaining how many jobs are actually advertised in the old fashioned way, and how many vacancies are really filled by that method - hardly any. I particularly like the fact that all the statistics, and there are many, are clearly backed up by referenced figures. For example, the fact that looking for employers' job postings on the internet has only a 4-10% success rate. This was a complete revelation to me.

The author shows deep understanding about how it actually feels to be unemployed and makes sensible practical suggestions. For example, this is the right time to keep fit, even if you can only afford to run; this is the right time to keep your place tidy, and not to live in chaos; this is the right time to catch up on our reading, perhaps especially anything that might help in your job search, but keeping your mind open avoids that 'I'm a sad victim of redundancy' syndrome.

There's an entire section on the spiritual aspects of tackling unemployment, which the author leaves you to apply to the rest of the book if you choose. So many manuals either proselytize their own brand of spirituality, whether New Age, Christian, whatever, or they are 100% bound in the commercial jobs market. This man was for many years an ordained Christian minister - however his approach to spirituality is applicable whatever your belief system. For me it was one of the best parts of the book.

Suitable for anyone looking to get a new job, change jobs or find more meaning in their work/life balance. Be prepared to do the exercises in order to get the best from this book. Get the up-to-date version if you can, because the statistics and many links are reviewed annually. In these uncertain months following the Brexit vote, it's good to have the online links for the latest picture if you can. Although this book was written in the USA with that market in mind, in my view, any intelligent reader could adapt the ideas to the UK market, especially now that so much job-hunting is done online.

Very clearly laid out and suitable for those with a visual disability.
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on 4 August 2014
A very thorough and entertaining book. Well worth buying if you aren't happy in your current job or are out of work. Lots of activities to do to help you clarify your ideal job - and how to go about getting it. I bought this book about 10 years ago and lent it out (doh!). Bought the Kindle version this time, it has a load of worksheets you can download. Cannot recommend this book highly enough.
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VINE VOICEon 4 December 2012
I bought this book on the recommendation of a friend but had low expectations. I thought it was going to be a jobs manual related mainly to the USA. How wrong I was.

This book addresses the task of finding a new job in such a detailed, thorough way that it could more properly be called a life review. In fact, the author suggests you do treat unemployment as a chance for a life review, and fully appreciates how hard that can be. It contains the kind of chapters one might expect: How to find Hope, Seven Secrets about the Jobs Market Today, The Best and Worst Ways to Look for Jobs, Life/Work Planning - Planning a Campaign of Attack, Understanding Yourself, Social Media, Five Ways to Change Career, CV Tips, How to Deal with Problems on Your CV, Starting Your Own Business.

I particularly like the fact that all the statistics, and there are many, are clearly backed up by referenced figures. For example, the fact that looking for employers' job postings on the internet has only a 4-10% success rate. This was a complete revelation to me.

The author shows deep understanding about how it actually feels to be unemployed and makes sensible practical suggestions. For example, this is the right time to keep fit, even if you can only afford to run; this is the right time to keep your place tidy, and not to live in chaos; this is the right time to catch up on our reading, perhaps especially anything that might help in your job search, but keeping your mind open avoids that 'I'm a sad victim of redundancy' syndrome.

There's an entire section on the spiritual aspects of tackling unemployment, which the author leaves you to apply to the rest of the book if you choose. So many manuals either proselytize their own brand of spirituality, whether New Age, Christian, whatever, or they are 100% bound in the commercial jobs market. This man was for many years an ordained Christian minister - however his approach to spirituality is applicable whatever your belief system. For me it was one of the best parts of the book.

Suitable for anyone looking to get a new job, change jobs or find more meaning in their work/life balance. Get the up-to-date version if you can, because the statistics and many links are reviewed annually.

Very clearly laid out and suitable for those with a visual disability.
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on 25 May 2017
very ok
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on 26 June 2017
The book is good, but might be more relevant for the American job hunters and career changers.
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on 11 May 2017
Book in very good condition!
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on 31 October 2003
Its simple and sypathetic to those who really don't know what to do in their career. But it's also useful for those who have a direction and a plan. Richard writes with humour and candour to show that all is not lost and you can get the job you want. A series of uncomplicated exercises will reveal your strengths and weaknesses, likes and dislikes. This gives you a basis for moving on to choose sectors where you might like to work. It's a gradual process and the book reccommends innovative and different ways to find jobs that satisfy and can be excelled in. He adds a spiritual touch and is clearly the expert in his field. It's a great book. He's a great author.
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on 12 April 2009
I came across this book about 15 years ago by chance. I had just had a job interview which went well, so I thought, and I found this book on sale at Waterstones. I didn't get the job but I did buy the book and I read it from cover to cover and did all the exercises. At the end of the book after completing the exercises I had a real idea of the area I should be looking for a job in. At that time it was working in property for a University. By coincidence (or was it fate) that following weekend my local University advertised a job for Head of Property. I got it and the rest is history.

Its funny that you tend to believe that you have to follow jobs which you an society indicate are right. This book helps you to think freely, chuck out the bull, and find the job thats right for you.

Over the past 10 years I have bought the book for 4 unemployed friends and all have benefitted.

What can you lose by buying the book? Nothing but the cover price in my view.
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