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on 17 March 2000
This is the first book of this sort that I have read, and was surprised how often I found myself thinking, "Yep, thats me!". Although it was something of a relief to realise that there are so many other people who are hopeless with money. This book made me think a lot about how I spend my money. In the first few chapters she describes clearing the clutter from your financial life in order to make way for other things, ie, more money. Steps like opening your bank statements and checking them so you know how much money you have, not keeping everything for ever, and looking around the house and finding 25 things that you would be willing to throw straight in the bin. Suze emphasises the phrase "People first. Then money, then things", and backs up her arguments so sucinctly at times I found it hard to even think about arguing. She then goes on to cover other topics, such as coping with death (in a finacial way) both before and after the event, and the benefits of prenuptual agreements before the big day. Overall it was a very easy read, especially considering the deep thinking and lifetime habbits it wants to change.
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The Courage to Be Rich provides support for overcoming your stalled thinking about money. If you lack confidence about money, have money problems, or have bad feelings about your relationship to money, you will find this book helpful. I have graded the book from the perspective of people in this category.
On the other hand, if you have lots of money and feel good about what you are doing, you will hate this book. This is a self-help guide more along the lines of Unleash the Power Within than it is a financial guide. If you want to add to your perspectives about how to make more money, I suggest that you shift to Rich Dad, Poor Dad instead. For you, The Courage to Be Rich is a one star book.
I appreciate the care and consideration Ms. Orman shows to her readers who may be suffering from emotional overwhelm (such as often occurs during and after a divorce, after a loved one dies, or while buying a first home). Her lists will probably help these anguished souls.
Although money has a lot to do with math, Ms. Orman correctly perceives that it is all about emotion as well. Emotion and math do not mix well, and she provides many useful insights into how to make them work better together.
An experienced and credentialed psychological counselor she is not, however. I suspect this book would have been better with two co-authors, one who is an expert on emotions about money and the other who is an expert on money to supplement Ms. Orman's skill as a communicator.
Ms. Orman is neither, so th is book's treatment is pretty lightweight in both areas. But if it gets you started in dealing with your issues, all the better for you.
The only part that seemed totally inadequate was her writing off of tax issues: You will spend a lot of money on taxes in your life and your choices do have a large impact on how much you will spend. Her advice is to feel good about paying more taxes because your income is higher. By contrast, someone who really wants to be rich needs to compound as much money tax-free or tax-deferred as possible. This book does not begin to address that subject.
The Courage to Be Rich is a better book for dealing with specific life traumas such as divorce, death, and so forth. This book would be a good gift to a friend who has such an event in his or her life.
Her stories are good, because they bring home the message of how crippling too much emotion can be, so we take this problem more seriously.
I think the biggest misconception people have about money is that they do not need to address their feelings about money. In that sense, Ms. Orman is doing a lot for us by reminding us that we have deeply held beliefs and attitudes that deserve being reexamined from time to time. I enjoyed reading the book, although it only added to stockpile of stories, rather than my knowledge.
Maybe the book's obvious appeal for general audiences can best be understood by thinking about the experience of watching a tear-jerker of a movie or television show -- you get a great feeling from knowing that the cataclysm is not happening to you.
If you have heard Ms. Orman speak at length on television (which she does a lot), you can probably safely skip this book.
To get a good return on your time with this review, I suggest that you pick one belief about money that you have where strong emotion comes into play. If that emotion does not serve you well, rephrase what you believe until it does serve you in the right way. Then, you'll have mastered a skill for having more!
Live with rich thoughts and warm emotions!
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on 27 March 1999
This latest book by Suze Orman continues her wonderful advice combining how to feel positive about making and collecting lots of money with simple "how to" investment advice about things like the common mortgage and retirement plan. This book is especially good for people who have unique problems and need basic financial advice. Her greatest contribution is to make people realize that on an emotional level, it is okay to want to be rich and her exercises help us develop THE COURAGE TO BE RICH. It is not as easy as it sounds. The psychological side of us keeps putting up "stalls" to succeeding. We need to ask ourselves some tough questions to deal with how we feel, what needs to be done and to develop solutions that make us and everyone else better off. I recommend THE 2,000 PERCENT SOLUTION if you are interested in identifying your own "stalls" and want to start asking some of the tough questions. You will start to succeed in many new ways and at a much faster rate. Read both books to become so much more effective and develop the courage to accept the good things that come your way.
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The Courage to Be Rich provides support for overcoming your stalled thinking about money. If you lack confidence about money, have money problems, or have bad feelings about your relationship to money, you will find this book helpful. I have graded the book from the perspective of people in this category.
On the other hand, if you have lots of money and feel good about what you are doing, you will hate this book. This is a self-help guide more along the lines of Unleash the Power Within than it is a financial guide. If you want to add to your perspectives about how to make more money, I suggest that you shift to Rich Dad, Poor Dad instead. For you, The Courage to Be Rich is a one star book.
I appreciate the care and consideration Ms. Orman shows to her readers who may be suffering from emotional overwhelm (such as often occurs during and after a divorce, after a loved one dies, or while buying a first home). Her lists will probably help these anguished souls.
Although money has a lot to do with math, Ms. Orman correctly perceives that it is all about emotion as well. Emotion and math do not mix well, and she provides many useful insights into how to make them work better together.
An experienced and credentialed psychological counselor she is not, however. I suspect this book would have been better with two co-authors, one who is an expert on emotions about money and the other who is an expert on money to supplement Ms. Orman's skill as a communicator.
Ms. Orman is neither, so th is book's treatment is pretty lightweight in both areas. But if it gets you started in dealing with your issues, all the better for you.
The only part that seemed totally inadequate was her writing off of tax issues: You will spend a lot of money on taxes in your life and your choices do have a large impact on how much you will spend. Her advice is to feel good about paying more taxes because your income is higher. By contrast, someone who really wants to be rich needs to compound as much money tax-free or tax-deferred as possible. This book does not begin to address that subject.
The Courage to Be Rich is a better book for dealing with specific life traumas such as divorce, death, and so forth. This book would be a good gift to a friend who has such an event in his or her life.
Her stories are good, because they bring home the message of how crippling too much emotion can be, so we take this problem more seriously.
I think the biggest misconception people have about money is that they do not need to address their feelings about money. In that sense, Ms. Orman is doing a lot for us by reminding us that we have deeply held beliefs and attitudes that deserve being reexamined from time to time. I enjoyed reading the book, although it only added to stockpile of stories, rather than my knowledge.
Maybe the book's obvious appeal for general audiences can best be understood by thinking about the experience of watching a tear-jerker of a movie or television show -- you get a great feeling from knowing that the cataclysm is not happening to you.
If you have heard Ms. Orman speak at length on television (which she does a lot), you can probably safely skip this book.
To get a good return on your time with this review, I suggest that you pick one belief about money that you have where strong emotion comes into play. If that emotion does not serve you well, rephrase what you believe until it does serve you in the right way. Then, you'll have mastered a skill for having more!
Live with rich thoughts and warm emotions!
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on 16 March 1999
Suze Orman's "credentials" in finance are totally fraudulent. She has no college background in finance and she's largely made up her experience in the financial world. She was never a broker, just a secretary to one. Her tone throughout her new book, and on the PBS series accompanying it, is patronizing and barely masks her true motive--making more money. Indeed, she doesn't hide the fact that making money is akin to finding God--after all, Orman has admitted consulting her crystals before making financial decisions.
The title of her book is OFFENSIVE, as it implies that accumulating wealth is, or should be, one's chief life goal, and that becoming rich is simply a matter of "courage"--as if the central reason the middle-class and the poor aren't rich is because they aren't courageous enough! (never mind the complex social, economic, and cultural ills that contribute to poverty). Orman is nothing more than a peddlar of snake oil. She may be a wealthy woman, but she's totally shallow one too, devoid of any moral sense and true courage. What lasting and meaningful contribution has she made to humanity?? Thanks to pariahs like Orman, the United States is quickly becoming an oligarchy--the poor be damned.
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on 5 April 1999
A friend of mine introduced me to the Orman books. I read 9 Steps to Financial Freeddom first and loved it. So I was very open to the new book Courage to Be Rich. What a disappointment! It starts out as a "psychology of money" book and continues on w/ anecdotes about various people's experiences.
This book is best suited for people who are wary of taking control of their money; people who need help getting started to look at the numbers. For those who are aware, have taken the plunge into investing, are paying down on debt, this book won't help the way 9 Steps to Financial Freedom did.
I'd say read it at the library or buy one copy for the office and share it. But don't buy it for yourself. Put your money to better use.
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on 25 March 1999
Well, I finally read the final chapter of this book last night. The misinformation in the book goes far beyond mere mistakes. There are glaring errors in the book and I don't know who did some of the math but they certainly did not graduate from MIT. The stories that Suze has to convey tell about her own success, but with stories like these there is often more than meets the eye. I wish I could recommend this book, but I can't and I felt like it was not worth my time and effort. Better luck next time Suze, but before you write your next book readers need to ask this question:Do we really need another Suze Orman book that will add to the millions of dollars that she has already made?? The answer has to be No!
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The Courage to Be Rich provides support for overcoming your stalled thinking about money. If you lack confidence about money, have money problems, or have bad feelings about your relationship to money, you will find this book helpful. I have graded the book from the perspective of people in this category.
On the other hand, if you have lots of money and feel good about what you are doing, you will hate this book. This is a self-help guide more along the lines of Unleash the Power Within than it is a financial guide. If you want to add to your perspectives about how to make more money, I suggest that you shift to Rich Dad, Poor Dad instead. For you, The Courage to Be Rich is a one star book.
I appreciate the care and consideration Ms. Orman shows to her readers who may be suffering from emotional overwhelm (such as often occurs during and after a divorce, after a loved one dies, or while buying a first home). Her lists will probably help these anguished souls.
Although money has a lot to do with math, Ms. Orman correctly perceives that it is all about emotion as well. Emotion and math do not mix well, and she provides many useful insights into how to make them work better together.
An experienced and credentialed psychological counselor she is not, however. I suspect this book would have been better with two co-authors, one who is an expert on emotions about money and the other who is an expert on money to supplement Ms. Orman's skill as a communicator.
Ms. Orman is neither, so th is book's treatment is pretty lightweight in both areas. But if it gets you started in dealing with your issues, all the better for you.
The only part that seemed totally inadequate was her writing off of tax issues: You will spend a lot of money on taxes in your life and your choices do have a large impact on how much you will spend. Her advice is to feel good about paying more taxes because your income is higher. By contrast, someone who really wants to be rich needs to compound as much money tax-free or tax-deferred as possible. This book does not begin to address that subject.
The Courage to Be Rich is a better book for dealing with specific life traumas such as divorce, death, and so forth. This book would be a good gift to a friend who has such an event in his or her life.
Her stories are good, because they bring home the message of how crippling too much emotion can be, so we take this problem more seriously.
I think the biggest misconception people have about money is that they do not need to address their feelings about money. In that sense, Ms. Orman is doing a lot for us by reminding us that we have deeply held beliefs and attitudes that deserve being reexamined from time to time. I enjoyed reading the book, although it only added to stockpile of stories, rather than my knowledge.
Maybe the book's obvious appeal for general audiences can best be understood by thinking about the experience of watching a tear-jerker of a movie or television show -- you get a great feeling from knowing that the cataclysm is not happening to you.
If you have heard Ms. Orman speak at length on television (which she does a lot), you can probably safely skip this book.
To get a good return on your time with this review, I suggest that you pick one belief about money that you have where strong emotion comes into play. If that emotion does not serve you well, rephrase what you believe until it does serve you in the right way. Then, you'll have mastered a skill for having more!
Live with rich thoughts and warm emotions!
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on 22 April 1999
After reading this book I almost wanted to cry. The reason for my sad state is that I realized how much I payed for this book. Thank God I returned it and got my money back.
The book is filled with misinformation and there are a number of factual errors as well. This is a result of a rushed job instead of a well thought out project.
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on 7 April 1999
Its not worth your time or effort. Live below your means, develop a sensible budget and stick to it, invest wisely for the long haul, and don't plan your retirement on winning the lotto - and FEEL good about not living paycheck to paycheck. There, I just saved you the time and money you would have wasted in reading this book.
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