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on 8 March 1999
This lengthy narrative, rich in detail and allegory, will benefit anyone with an interest in cross cultural thought. If we can trust Biocca's telling of Helena Valero's "displaced" life among the Yanomami, then we have with "Yanoama" something truly unparalleled. But it's virtues may pass unnoticed among the "professionally trained" in cross-cultural studies. Many anthropological texts, these days, navel-gaze through interpersonal thickets of this or that "other" modernity, extending a Western "cosmopolitanism" upon peoples who often do not share our sensibilities. Biocca's book by contrast offers a refreshingly descriptive account of the intercultural life of a young girl, age 11, who was captured by Yanomami indians, only to live with them and learn their customs, differences, and political tensions before returning to "the West" some twenty years later. Although her story is by now quite old (she was kidnapped in the 1930's), and the Yanomami now live an entirely different way of life, the reader will find Valero's "ethnographic" upbringing an essential supplement to any anthropological or philosophical understanding of Yanomami life. If you doubt the descriptive quality of this book, look no further than N. Chagnon's contemporaneous (1968) but still-celebrated "Yanomamo" to see a real straw-man depiction of these particular Brazilan and Venezualan peoples.
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on 10 May 1999
I liked this book! After reading other anthropological works that mainly concentrate on the male aspect of tribal living, this book shows the other side of the coin.
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on 4 November 1997
Disappointing as-told-to-account by Portuguese woman kidnapped as a child by Yanomami and raised to adulthood. She tells us what happened but gives us no hint of her own feelings and no perspective that helps us understand the motives of the Indians.
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on 9 March 1998
This book was so monotonous it screams assigned reading- you wouldn't read this otherwise.
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