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Customer reviews

4.0 out of 5 stars
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4.0 out of 5 stars

on 2 April 2015
This volume contains the middle Millar stories plus three mini stories from various specials.

The Millar story isn’t bad and you see him twisting and bending the characters to express the more home-grown political message he is wanting to. He has fun with his new toys and spins an interesting yarn. Casey delivers a run of the mill action romp with some old Stormwatch references. Jenkins turns in a mature and touching story whose title, Isolation, says it all. This is the star of the show.

Ellis has clearly said goodbye to The Authority by this point. He basically has Hawksmoor recap the previous stories while doing parkour. While this is a definite let down story wise it is actually quite a poetic and elegant delivery.

There are plenty of artists at work here. Even the main story changes penciller and inker halfway through in a noticeable but not disastrous way. All the minor stories are beautifully rendered, obeying the previous conventions. The Ellis tale does have a very different visual style with the words and pictures kept entirely separate and this compliments the internal narration very well. Weston’s two issue stand-in for Quietly makes the biggest impression and his pin sharp detail seems to be the closest to the original Hitch vision and the most suited for the ‘widescreen’ format.

Thumbs Up!
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on 18 January 2012
"Earth Inferno" follows a series of global catastrophes - Rome broken up by an earthquake, New York drowned by a massive tidal wave, San Francisco burned down by a volcano - ravaging the planet as part of a nefarious plot by a former doctor trying to get his powers back. It's up to The Authority to stop him but they underestimated his abilities and they now have a real fight on their hands!

This is an interesting book to follow up the first two excellent books in the series. Mark Millar does a fine job of writing the mini-series while Frank Quitely does a fantastic job of making a pudgy 50-something wearing a dinner jacket seem menacing.

The other stories here are more character development ones. Angie the Engineer wants to get laid by a stubby Mexican chap while Jack Hawksmoor talks about running across the cities of the world to let off steam.

It's a fun book with some great writing and great art, fans of The Authority will love it. If you're new though you'll want to start where it all began with "Relentless".
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on 2 April 2015
This volume contains the middle Millar stories plus three mini stories from various specials.

The Millar story isn’t bad and you see him twisting and bending the characters to express the more home-grown political message he is wanting to. He has fun with his new toys and spins an interesting yarn. Casey delivers a run of the mill action romp with some old Stormwatch references. Jenkins turns in a mature and touching story whose title, Isolation, says it all. This is the star of the show.

Ellis has clearly said goodbye to The Authority by this point. He basically has Hawksmoor recap the previous stories while doing parkour. While this is a definite let down story wise it is actually quite a poetic and elegant delivery.

There are plenty of artists at work here. Even the main story changes penciller and inker halfway through in a noticeable but not disastrous way. All the minor stories are beautifully rendered, obeying the previous conventions. The Ellis tale does have a very different visual style with the words and pictures kept entirely separate and this compliments the internal narration very well. Weston’s two issue stand-in for Quietly makes the biggest impression and his pin sharp detail seems to be the closest to the original Hitch vision and the most suited for the ‘widescreen’ format.

Thumbs Up!
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 2 April 2015
This volume contains the middle Millar stories plus three mini stories from various specials.

The Millar story isn’t bad and you see him twisting and bending the characters to express the more home-grown political message he is wanting to. He has fun with his new toys and spins an interesting yarn. Casey delivers a run of the mill action romp with some old Stormwatch references. Jenkins turns in a mature and touching story whose title, Isolation, says it all. This is the star of the show.

Ellis has clearly said goodbye to The Authority by this point. He basically has Hawksmoor recap the previous stories while doing parkour. While this is a definite let down story wise it is actually quite a poetic and elegant delivery.

There are plenty of artists at work here. Even the main story changes penciller and inker halfway through in a noticeable but not disastrous way. All the minor stories are beautifully rendered, obeying the previous conventions. The Ellis tale does have a very different visual style with the words and pictures kept entirely separate and this compliments the internal narration very well. Weston’s two issue stand-in for Quietly makes the biggest impression and his pin sharp detail seems to be the closest to the original Hitch vision and the most suited for the ‘widescreen’ format.

Thumbs Up!
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse


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