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on 3 January 2014
It is a little book with ideas and practices by this great filmmaker. Elaborated are notes on role of sound in film, Bresson's experiences during filming and mantra like statements, which will be appreciated largely by filmmaking community only.

Still I would recommend it.
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on 19 April 2000
This is the most important book on film ever published. It treats film as a separate, autonomous art, not dependent on other art forms for its expression. To experience cinematography (as a viewer of Bresson's films) is to be actively participating in this art. It is not to do with being hypnotised into a passive state, passively following a plot. You create the plot.
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on 3 October 2011
Essential reading for any fans of Bresson or his films. It's a short book containing several hundred disjointed notes (or "scars" as the forward says) on the nature of cinema and this concept of "cinematography". Bresson didn't think of cinematography as we do, he divided cinema into two, firstly the majority, those who put theatre on screen and who were stuck using actors and music (he always refers to his actors as models and he hates all music in film); and secondly those who work in cinematography, which for Bresson was the proper way of making films. It's very interesting to read a film philosophy that I completely disagree with on almost every level (except his attitude to music). Bresson didn't believe in beautiful shots, didn't believe in close-ups, didn't believe in acting, hated the idea of mixing art forms and was generally a bit of a mad man really. He basically in this book says that what everyone else is doing is wrong and what he is doing is right. But the tragic irony is that he was striving for the truth, for the authentic from his non-actors, but as a result of his methods the performances in his films are some of the least truthful I've ever seen. There is a certain amount of insanity in casting a non actor as Joan of Arc for example, but God love him, that's exactly what he did in his pursuit of the truth and at least from these notes it appears he never stopped trusting his ideology of vision and sound, although the later notes do get less judgemental of everyone else's "theatre on screen".
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