Learn more Download now Shop now Learn more Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Learn More Shop now Shop now Learn more Shop Fire Shop Kindle The Grand Tour Prize Draw Learn more Shop Women's Shop Men's

Customer reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars
15
4.3 out of 5 stars


on 6 January 1999
The author's style is wonderful- much more personal than most texts dealing with management, while still managing to be more than a collection of 'cute' anecdotes. This book will provide the greatest benefit to professionals, such as myself, who have had a few years experience in software development processes and are looking for that 'next level' of guidance. In that respect, Steve Maguire's writing is effective because he presents knowledge to the reader as if from a mentor to an apprentice.
I would, however, contrast it with another work which I believe to be equally important though radically different- "The Mythical Man Month". Where Maguire writes as a seasoned guru with an arm around your shoulder, Brooks writes like an evangelist and discusses software development on an almost religous plane. "The Mythical Man Month" also approaches the subject in a broader, more philosophical sense. In the end, I feel that I've gotten more out of each of these books having read the other. While contrasting in terms of eras (mainframe vs pc) and environments (short-sleeve button-down IBM vs hacky-sack Microsoft), it's interesting to note how many conclusions are shared between these works.
Bottom-line: read this book, you'll love it :)
0Comment| 4 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 15 December 1998
There is enough good advice in any one chapter to improve your next software project (or your life.) Unfortunately, critical principles are explained through highly specific examples. If you are already an experienced project manager or mentor then the book will read like common (if rare) sense. If you are not an experienced project manager or mentor this book will not teach you how to become one. Try Steve McConnell's Rapid Development instead.
A real danger of this book is that the examples can be taken to mean exactly the opposite of what the author intends. For example, it would be easy to read the author's objection to *needless* process work as an objection to process work of all kinds.
0Comment| 5 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 29 November 1998
There is more than enough good advice in any one chapter to make your project (or your life) dramatically better. The problem is that the book discusses important principles through highly specific examples. It is all too easy for people to misread specific examples and come to exactly the wrong conclusion. For example, Maquire is against needless process work (what developer isn't?) He's also working at the largest software organization in the world. In the smaller organizations I've worked with there is a crying need for more process work, not less. Reading Maquire it would be easy for someone to find "evidence" that they should spend less time on design work and planning! This isn't Maquire's point, but he's not there to straighten the reader out. If you are an experienced project manager and mentor you'll resonate with a lot of what Maquire says. If you aren't that experienced this book won't teach you how to be a great project manager. Get Steve McConnell's vastly superior "Rapid Development" instead.
0Comment| 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 25 January 1998
This is the best book I've read on managing and coordinating a software development effort. It discussed a lot of the software development "time wasters" as well as good practices. Additionally, unlike a lot of other software books, this book is extremely enjoyable to read. I finished it in only two days. I've already recommended this book to a bunch of my coworkers.
0Comment| One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 1 August 1996
Maguire pokes holes in the conventional wisdom concerning
leading development teams. He uses humor and real-world
examples to convey valuable information on how to run teams
effectively. Includes a highly principled view of the manager's
responsibility to the whole organization not just his/her teams.

Above all, it is valuable not just for product leads, but for
anyone who manages (or would like to learn to manage)in an
industry where deadlines, quality, and customer desires
regularly collide.
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 8 November 2011
I read this book maybe 15 years ago and it was a formative experience for me. Since then I've gone on to work in large software companies in product development/software engineering and the general sentiment and approach often laid out in this book has stayed with me.

It's probably way out of date in terms of technology these days. But if you can read past that, read into it the general ideas and approaches, there is a wealthy of experience.
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 2 July 1997
Maguire has done a great job in terms of tackling tough problems and making them easy to understand. This book should be read by senior management in any organization that does development.
It sits on my shelf next to "Mythical Man Month" and McConnell's "Rapid Development", but it doesn't stay there for long. I've given away a few copies of it, and keep referring back to mine.
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 29 April 1999
I am a software engineer with 20 years of experience and found this text to be informative and useful. Mr. Maguire's style is easily read and his observations are backed by numerous examples. The text is limited, however, by Mr. Maguires lack of experience in other types of software projects that don't have double digit headcounts. Overall I found the book to be a good addition to my library.
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 18 December 1998
I recommend this book to anyone managing (or thinking of managing) a development team. It contains practical advice, good examples, and a real world feel for how developers work (and can improve their work) and how managers can "stay out of their way" so that they can get their work done. This is one of the only Microsoft Press books that I read from cover to cover. Highly recommended!
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 25 August 1998
This book is distilled experience. Common sense, easy to apply advice that can make your work (and your life) blossom. In Steve's words, experience is a sum of tiny bits of knowledge each of which might not seem all that important but all together make the difference. And that's what the book is all about.
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse

Sponsored Links

  (What is this?)