Learn more Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Learn More Shop now Learn more Shop Fire Shop Kindle Learn More Shop now Shop Women's Shop Men's

Customer reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars
32
4.3 out of 5 stars
Format: Paperback|Change
Price:£5.95+ Free shipping with Amazon Prime


There was a problem filtering reviews right now. Please try again later.

on 1 April 2014
A refreshing look into the spreading of the Good News of the Gospels. Would recommend that all Catholics read it and reflect on it.
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 12 March 2014
This is an amazing book. Full of wisdom and a great guide for how to behave and think of others, especially the poor.
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 26 February 2014
Content is helpful but print is so small it is very difficult to read. Overall disappointed due to this problem.
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 1 August 2016
Very pleased with product and quality of service, thank you!
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 15 October 2014
Dellighted to have this easily accessible at any time
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 9 December 2014
Superb. Everyone should read it.
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 16 August 2015
Father Stan F says...
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 10 February 2014
Like so many other books written about Francis, The Joy of the Gospel defines the problems of the world - priest pedophilia, contraception, abortions, etc. - without offering any viable solutions.

In those few cases where he does take a stand, his record tells us he says these things only for political purposes. His words say one thing while his actions say the opposite.

For example, he strikes out against capitalism. Yet, for twenty years he fought against every social program to help the poor - the reason left wing socialists in Argentina were so enraged by his election.

Francis has been compared to John Paul I because both men defined their papacies as being for the poor. Yet, nothing could be further from the truth. John Paul - like Marx before him - would force (tax) the rich to help the poor. The Vatican Murders: The Life and Death of John Paul I. Francis - like Christ before him - would ask the rich to help the poor; something one knows does not work.

Francis has also been compared to John Paul I concerning women in the Church. He has made it clear that women should aspire to high position. Consider his record.

There are about 40 curial posts (a pope's cabinet) Secretary of State (Vice President), Prefecture of Economic Affairs (Chief Financial Officer) and Prefecture Apostolic Tribunal (Attorney General), etc. About 200 cardinals make up a pope's Senate. Concerning a pope's governors, 600 bishops rule the field.

In the past year, in addition to taking women ordination off the table, Francis has confirmed a man to every single one of these positions together with over 800 deputies. No women allowed. Even the Supreme Court is a man (Francis).

And why are no women allowed? Francis claims Christ chose only men for his cabinet. Not withstanding that only men wrote the gospels, what would the United States Congress be today if one considers only men made up its first Congress?

At a time the most powerful nation in the world is looking forward to its first woman president, the Roman Catholic Church will not allow a woman to occupy the lowest rung in its mainstream management.

Francis says one thing to gain political favor, yet, does the opposite. He knows he can get away with this because - in his mind - he knows women are not too bright. He has very sound reason to think this way as more than half his congregation is women; women who have been condition since early childhood by his predecessors that little boys are better than little girls. He intends to keep it that way. The question is: When will little girls grow up to see the truth?

Conversely, in his Sunday Angelus September 10, 1978, John Paul I declared: "God is the Father. More so, the Mother." He was right. According to tales told by ancient 'men' God is a 'man'. Yet, according to all we really know, God is the Mother. In 1978, the Church was not only looking at its first woman priest but it was looing at its first women cardinal. The thought of a woman pope would bring a smile to the lips of John Paul I; it strikes a dagger into the chauvinistic heart of Francis I. Obviously I am not running for high office here. But I am telling the truth.

Concerning women and a host of other issues John Paul told a symposium of cardinals: "It is time for Mother Church to catch up to the world she lives in." One reason he was the youngest pope to die in four hundred years. The Vatican Murders: The Life and Death of John Paul I answers the question: Did his struggle for women, homosexuals and the poor cost him his life?

`The Joy of the Gospel' discusses problems - no real solutions.

To be honest - though the only true record of John Paul I - 'The Vatican Murders' is not that well written. The author had a rather hostile encounter with John Paul I when he was a bishop of Vittorio Veneto which prompted him to write the book. It is a chronological record of the press that followed his every move from the time he became a bishop in 1958 until he was found dead in his bed in 1978. Nevertheless, Lucien Gregoire has done a lot of work in researching and bringing back to life the controversial man.
0Comment| One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 13 February 2015
Inspirational
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 29 January 2014
Despite the pathetic rants of the Secularists - everyone loves Pope Francis, for his simplicity and a brain that makes rationalists look like cretins (always bashing religion). Read the man for yourself - religion is alive and active!
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse

Customers also viewed these items

£4.25

Need customer service? Click here

Sponsored Links

  (What is this?)