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4.6 out of 5 stars
150
4.6 out of 5 stars
Format: Hardcover|Change
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on 13 July 2017
One of the amazing books in the disk world series. Best read as part of a pseudo series called the "death series" of disk world novels. Great on its own but you'll pick up on little references to the previous books if you've read them. They don't affect the plot but it's a nice feeling when you get the references.
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on 4 December 2015
This was a gift for a family member. The item went down extremely well and the recipient loved it. Item arrived on time and with no issue.
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on 12 September 2017
perfect
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on 10 August 2017
Brilliant music links all through the book
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on 7 June 2000
It had to happen some time. We'd already talked about movies (Moving Pictures) and gods (Small Gods), so it only could be matter of time before Pratchett dealt with that other passtime, music. And he does it very well too. But I thought this book didn't actually concentrate on music that much and spent more time dealing with Death's disappearance. The introduction of Susan, Death's grand-daughter, by adoption, is a brilliant idea, and having her take over the business is a genius touch. The bits which are about music are well written and funny, but it all draws itself to a rather disappointing end. Not one of his best, but still very good nonethless. (P.S., for all those who have read it, did you realise that Llamedos, where the lead singer comes from, is not a Welsh name, but sod-em-all written backwards?)
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on 20 January 2017
There's used and there's rubbish. This is rubbish. It arrived in such a shoddy conditions I wouldn't have paid 20 pence in a charity shop for it. Gone straight in the bin as it's unreadable.
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on 1 April 2017
If you read this, you don't need to read this.
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on 27 September 2016
ok
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on 4 June 2017
Arrive on time and in perfect order, as advertised. Absolutly brilliant.
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This is the seventeenth Discworld novel by Terry Pratchett, and once again features the delightfully put-upon Rincewind, the “Great Wizzard” (as the Agateans know him). The title refers to the (probably apocryphal) Chinese proverb/curse “May you live in interesting times”. It’s particularly relevant to this story, as Rincewind, ‘rescued’ by the wizards at the Unseen University from a desert island where he was enjoying a particularly restful period of peace and quiet, is sent by teleportation to the Agatean Empire. There he finds himself caught up in a revolution of sorts, as the Emperor is dying, and the Empire is caught up in political turmoil between the Sung, Fang, Hong, Tang and McSweeney clans. Rincewind finds himself caught between a rock and hard place in the capital of the Agatean Empire, Hunghung – is he a peaceful revolutionary, or a revolutionary peacemaker? Life is not made any easier by the arrival of the Silver Horde lead by Cohen the Barbarian; and where has the Luggage gone?

This is another great Discworld novel; I always enjoy the stories with Rincewind; he’s so hapless and so resigned to be a pawn of fate that his continued survival seems to surprise him even more every time it happens. The Patrician makes a brief appearance in the book, and the wizards of the Unseen University are up to their usual standard of ineptitude. Twoflower makes a welcome return, and the involvement of Cohen and his barbarian horde in the Agatean Empire make for ‘interesting’ reading. Great stuff.
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