Learn more Shop now Learn more Shop now Shop now Shop now Learn More Shop now Shop now Learn more Shop Fire Shop Kindle Worried Blues Shop now Fitbit

Customer reviews

4.4 out of 5 stars
1,447
4.4 out of 5 stars
Format: Paperback|Change
Price:£5.19+ Free shipping with Amazon Prime


There was a problem filtering reviews right now. Please try again later.

It appears from the reviews that this book's a little like Marmite - you'll either like it, or you just won't click with it.

If you like a quirky, bizarre story then you've come to the right place. You know those sort of stories that immerse you in a surreal fantasy world that could just possibly exist alongside an everyday real one? Whilst people's lives intertwine with it, oblivious to its existence? Then yes, this is DEFINATELY for you.

It's dreamlike and slightly nuts in places, but altogether highly original. Yet it's told in a clever, matter-of-fact way that it actually makes it strangely plausible. It's a fantasy-fairylike-tale with a whopping, great punch throughout.

I must mention that the intimidation of the young boy by a truly vile villain, together with the 'angry birds' scene later in the book are captured in a perfectly sinister manner, painting quite a graphic image in your mind.

And I'll admit, I got myself lost a couple of times with the changing story between the past (the young boy) and the present (the boy grown up), particularly toward the end, but a quick re-read of the chapter put me straight. That was my fault entirely and not the book - therefore, I would recommend giving it your 100% attention to fully appreciate it, it would be a crime not to.

This is the first book I've read by Neil Gaiman and it's left me wanting to read more. 4.5 stars out of 5.
0Comment| 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 30 April 2017
Well written (grammatically), but for me it just didn't evoke the childhood memories that other reviewers have mentioned. Perhaps I don't appreciate fairy tales any more! It's a bit like modern art - some people can see something interesting or aesthetically pleasing, and others just see a pretentious, incomprehensible and discordant mess. I fall into the latter category, and only finished the book through dogged determination.
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 23 June 2016
I'm not usually a fan of the supernatural, but this book got such good reviews that I decided to give it a try. I'm glad I did. The story starts with a man driving from a parent's funeral and deciding to visit his childhood home. From there, we're taken back to the seventies and the lonely life of a bookish child. What follows lifts the reader right out of the real world but the quality of the writing allowed me to be drawn in to a horrific fantasy. It's quite a short book, taking me less than a day to read, but I found it absolutely gripping.
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 28 July 2015
This is the first book of Neil Gaiman's I've read and to be honest I was disappointed. Not sure what I expected but I ploughed on to the end hoping it would be amazing and not predictable. It was the later. I didn't find it believable that the main character, a seven year old, would be so astute in saving the world and commenting on parenting skills. Maybe I'll come back to it later and re-read it to see the magic :)
0Comment| 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 28 May 2017
I'm a little younger now than when Neil Gaiman wrote this. However, I am still old enough to smile at some of the childhood references, such as old TV series with presenters dressed as American Indians, and dangerous gas fires in bedrooms. This is a book with themes about childhood memories; they are so much stronger and more vivid than those we form as adults. There is a light fantasy story that pulls you along. If you like childhood reminiscences, a touch of sadness - but not too much, and cats, then you should like this book.
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 21 May 2014
I enjoyed 'The Ocean At The End of The Lane' from beginning to end, I love the story of the narrator facing powers he does not understand in the shape of Ursula who arrives in his home shortly after the suicide of the lodger. The narrator makes friend with Lettie Hempstock, a girl who lives with her mother, Ginnie and her grandmother, Old Mrs Hempstock, all of the Hempstock women are different and have been part of the world for a long time, now they all have to fight against Ursula.

As I said, I enjoyed the book from the start to finish, I love the worlds that Neil Gaiman creates and how his stories unfold, you become part of the story.

A lovely read.
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 10 May 2017
Read this in one sitting on a flight home from Cuba - I'd have stopped to watch a movie or do something else but this is one of those books that you just can't put down... OK, so everything Neil Gaiman writes is brilliant, but this one isn't just the best book of his I've read, it's one of the best books I've ever read.
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 19 March 2017
I really enjoyed reading this book. It seems to be a simple story, but touches on many issues such as passage of time, the truth of memory and innocence of childhood. It begins in a realistic setting but events soon take a magical/fantastical turn and a tense adventure follows. Not what I expected when I started reading this book, but a pleasant surprise.
0Comment| One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 15 June 2014
This short novel enveloped me in its otherworldliness, a universe full of unknown powers and threats that lives within the world we know. The length, in between a novel and a short story, allows you to tear through the story and be absorbed. The story is essentially quite simple: good eventually wins over evil, though that win comes at a price. It is told with such warmth for the strong women and the young boy and paints such vivid scenes that it revived some memories of my own, leaving me aglow.
0Comment| 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 19 July 2015
Having previously read and enjoyed Neil Gaiman's Stardust, which is a straightforward fairy story for adults, I read this. I am not sure what genre it falls into, fantasy, sci-fi, child psychology! I couldn't put it down because I wanted to know how it ended but I can't say that I actually enjoyed it. Very well written but quite unsettling.
0Comment| One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse

Customers also viewed these items


Need customer service? Click here