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4.5 out of 5 stars
88
4.5 out of 5 stars
Format: Hardcover|Change
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on 12 July 2015
Honest and at times heartfelt book about his struggle with depression. Really gives you an insight into the jobbing footballer, rather than the preening, vastly rich ones that get all the publicity.
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on 1 November 2013
Very enlightening. Gives a vivid insight into life away from the players in the Premier League & the dramatic effect injuries can play. Your career is only as safe as the next game!!!
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on 7 January 2014
Very pleased with this purchase for my grandson who particularly wanted this book.

The service was quick and efficient. Goods were as described. Recipient was delighted.
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on 30 September 2014
A rollercoaster ride of a professional footballer's career, stripped down, bare. Read many a sportsmans autobiography and this is simply one of the best
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on 23 October 2013
This was a very good read with a great insight to his period at my own club. Interesting throughout and great detail about Clarke's personal troubles.
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on 19 September 2013
Was sceptical at first about reading a 'football book' but found I thoroughly enjoyed it. It provides a valuable insight into the career of a footballer, and the ups and downs attributed to such. A refreshingly honest autobiography, with a few highly amusing stories along the way. Can recommend.
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on 10 December 2013
A great read, thoroughly enjoyable, book. He is a very intelligent astute chap. It openend up our eyes to the life these footballers lead.
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on 27 January 2014
I would recommend that every one should read this book it gives a great insight into the football world. More than that it shows you shouldn't judge every one the same, footballers are very lucky but are still human and have the same issues we all face. Mr Clarke you are an inspiration.
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on 21 June 2014
Very honest and captivating read. You can't condone some of the things Clarke has done. All the same you can empethise with his situation.
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on 16 December 2014
This book leaves me very much in two minds. On one hand I've read it from cover to cover over two evenings and it does have a couple of stories that genuinely made me chuckle and Carlisle's story is, indeed, quasi interesting.

It's then that the "but"s come along. The first is principally stylistic - it isn't written in chronological or any other logical order, for example by subject, and it's not written particularly tightly. I can't help wondering whether he was trying to be too clever in writing it himself rather than with the help of a professional, but after a while I ended up getting annoyed by:
a) the constant jumping around various episodes in his life - as a result covering issues (often multiple times) in a rather superficial manner;
b) a number of times where he moaned about "having to get the book finished". Sorry it was such a chore fella.
c) the love in with Adrian Boothroyd. Get a room guys. Seriously.
d) apparent lack of editing - the phrase that sticks in my mind being "I called [him] on the phone", which brought a reflex response that "well you wouldn't call him using a hoover, would you?" - but then caused me to look in more detail at the passage and conclude that several paragraphs could have deleted. Coupled with b) I couldn't help thinking about it being more filler than killer.

Thing is, Tony Adams's book came out 15 years before this one. And, with respect, Adams has done things that the average man in the street may remember - both in terms of the profile of his problems and within the game. As such, followers of Carlisle's teams may find this more intrinsically interesting and feel more of a connection to the man than I did (although I suspect I have been to a few games he played in).

As such, the story ends up being "not particularly memorable young man with a lot of money and not a lot of sense does monumentally stupid things". Which has also been done before. To be fair, Carlisle acknowledges his poor life choices in a number of places - but his life decisions didn't get any better as he started addressing his problems. And that was where I lost sympathy. If you are an allegedly intelligent man, in your late 20s, with a wife, three kids and a half a million pound a year contract (in Burnley! How do you spend that much in Burnley?!), you have no excuse to be scrabbling around potless aged 32. If you know you are going to or likely to be driving half the length of the M1 to work every day, don't buy a 6 litre Merc and then moan about spending fortunes on petrol. Particularly if, as leader of the the PFA, you may feel some duty of care to your members to lead by example. So call me heartless, but I ended up just not caring.
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