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on 3 December 2016
This is, chronologically, the second in the Lonesome Dove series. Call and McRae are now experienced rangers, spending their time defending settlers, fighting native Americans, and carrying out any other tasks found for them. Like Dead Man's Walk - the first in the series - this book is episodic in form; there are three sections, each separated by a few years. In the first, they have a charismatic leader, Inish Scull, around whom, myths grow. When his famous horse is stolen, he sets off on foot to recover it. In later sections, the rangers continue their work whilst the Civil War rages to the north.
Throughout the book, the central characters' stories are interwoven with various tales, some short, some more complex. We follow the development of Call and McRae, and come to understand their motivations, strengths and flaws. For those readers, like me, who read Lonesome Dove before the prequels, the author has done an extraordinary job in filling in their back stories to produce the men we meet in that novel. There is also, over the two prequels, a sympathetic portrayal of the native Americans realisation that their way of life cannot survive.
In general, the book has all the strengths of Lonesome Dove and Dead Man's Walk; a light touch, sparse dialogue, a real feel for the time and place, and believable characters. There is, I think, more cruelty in this book than the others, but the world in which it is set was a cruel, brutish one, and it does contribute to the development of the main characters' weariness. It leads beautifully into the next book.
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on 27 March 2017
McMurty is most know for Lonesdove, and quite fairly it is a stunning novel. However the Lonesome Dove Series is incredible, and this novel gives us more from the key protagonists in Lonesome Dove, and feel as though the reader is the third rider, riding alongside them through their adventures, heartbreak and decisions. He has an ability to right with a sensitive touch despite the sometimes rough nature of some aspects of the book. The characters are not perfect individuals but it is very hard to not to feel as though you would be or would want to be friends with them.
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on 9 September 2013
Larry McMurtry is a wonderful writer- capturing not just the flavour of the West but with a talent for fleshing out even the most minor of his characters. I love the way he uses humour in sometimes unexpected ways. I came to his books through the 'Lonesome Dove' mini series with Robert Duvall as Gus McCrae and Tommy Lee Jones as Woodrow Call. They were obviously the perfect casting choices because e reading the books chronologically starting with 'Dead Man's Walk' their characters leap off the page fully formed.

I am still reading this book- having caught the other prequel TV series [ including this one] I know what happens in the main but that doesn't spoil the book in any way. We have three men caught in uncomfortable romantic situations - Gus having lost his enduring love Clara- moved away & married- Call spending time with a pregnant Maggie but unwilling to commit not because of her profession but because he doesn't want to give up rangering & settle down and Long Bill returning to town after an Indian raid to find his adored wife 'spoiled' because of rape.

Read the books in order and give yourself a real treat- wonderful writing- great stories!
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on 30 November 2015
I never used to read Westerns until I discovered Larry Mcmurty. Lonesome Dove got me started then I just had to devour the other three. Reading order from memory is:
Commence Moon.
Dead Man's walk
Lonesome Dove,
Streets of Laredo, I read Lonesome first being unaware of the series. Just get these books and hold Mcmurty wholly responsible for your temporary departure from the commitments of your normal existence.
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on 30 August 2017
An improvement on 'Book 1' of the prequels, but neither they nor the sequel (Streets of Laredo) add substantially to the infinitely better "Lonesome Dove" itself.
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on 19 April 2011
OK, first off this is not quite as good as Lonesome Dove, but it's not bad either. It charts Gus and Call's rise through the ranks of the Rangers and the changing times they're living in. Once again there's emotion in every paragraph and McMurtry never shies away from the less savoury aspects of those who lived in the west, whatever their race. There's brutality, beauty, poignancy, humour and pathos from the first page right through to the last.

If I have any major complaint it's that the third part (the book's divided into three sections) feels a little too rushed and jumps too far ahead of the preceding section. For all that, it remains a fine and rewarding read.
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on 25 June 2015
The continuing story of Call & Mcrae follows on and expands on the excellent Dead Mans walk.
A lot more detailed and not quite as brutal (Still very gruesome at times) and delves a lot deeper into the characters and especially the Comanches and Indian foes. Again some wonderful Characters especially Captain Scull. Dont miss this, it's a really good and engrossing read.
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on 24 April 2017
A very good book. Quite sad when you think that the Comanches were virtually wiped out
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on 21 April 2018
Really interesting story of the old west
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on 11 January 2018
great story read with the lonesome dove series
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