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on 12 March 2017
Difficult to get into this book. It bombards you with references to her relatives and you have difficulty in working out all the relationships. haven't finished it yet though.
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on 2 August 2017
a1
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on 9 September 2015
Great book covering a period in history I didn't get an opportunity to study in school
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on 31 March 2017
Another good read again read many of her books and will continue
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on 10 March 2017
Excellent. Thank you.
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on 7 June 2017
item as expected
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on 16 September 2010
I have just finished reading this book. I received it at the same time as my copy of Philippa Gregory's `The Red Queen' and thought that I would read this first so that I knew about the historical Margaret Beaufort. I found this book really interesting. What I like most about Elizabeth Norton's books is that she deals with her subjects chronologically and it is easy to follow the events of their lives. This book is full of fascinating details. I particularly liked the information on Margaret's third marriage to Henry Stafford, as well as her involvement in the conspiracies against Richard III. There were also lots of little details that kept me interested. Norton talks about what Margaret ate at particular events, and what she wore, as well as dealing with the more political aspects of her subject. All in all, I thought this was an excellent book and would recommend it to anyone.
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VINE VOICEon 30 December 2010
Margaret Beaufort was one of the remarkable women of the Tudor Dynasty (if one wants to count her as such) and of her times. Intelligent, shrewd, political, devoted to her son and his destiny, educated. A lady who managed her own destiny, not in the beginning, but later.

I enjoyed very much reading about her and her life. It is not the first biography about her, but it is the recent after a long time. Most enlightend were the chapters on her marriages and the relationships with her husbands. Far too often the focus is only on her son and their extraordinary relationship. So here the wife Margaret emerges.

Elisabeth Norton manage to revive the whole personality of Margaret and her ambitions. Her writing is superb and engaging. It is a real pleasure to read this book.
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on 8 April 2015
Very readable and informative, Elizabeth Norton’s book is packed with fascinating snippets of information about Margaret Beaufort and the times she lived in. I particularly liked the well-chosen excerpts from letters and writers of the time. Often portrayed as an austere, domineering figure, it was refreshing to see examples of Margaret Beaufort’s sense of humour and evidence that she did have a sensitive side. It can’t have been easy for her to be betrothed at the age of six then married to Edmund Tudor at twelve, finding herself pregnant almost immediately afterwards. This was apparently considered a bit hasty of him, even by the very different standards of the time, so it is hard to have much sympathy when Edmund dies of the plague before he even sees his son.

It is important to remember that Margaret Beaufort could have been queen – and perhaps paved the way for Elizabeth 1st, who saw her as a role model. It is also interesting to consider how much influence she had over her son, Henry VII – and how different Tudor history could have been if she had been around a bit longer to restrain her grandson, Henry VIII.

Inspired by Elizabeth's fascinating research I made the 'pilgrimage' to the room in Pembroke Castle where Margaret Beaufort gave birth to Henry VII and felt much closer to the real woman after reading this book. I rarely give a book five stars but in this case I enjoyed it so much I will—and I know this is a book I will return to in the future. Highly recommended!
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on 6 October 2010
A detailed biography of Lady Margaret Beaufort was long overdue. She is crucial figure in the Tudor story but often little is written about her other than details of her descent from John of Gaunt. What I particularly enjoyed was how the writer brought out Margaret's relatonships within the Houses of York and Lancaster. It also explains how Henry Tudor's claim to the throne was less remote than is often suggested. This book tells us much detail about this important figure and her other marriages.
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