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on 5 December 2017
Great book and good service
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on 26 October 2017
good
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on 25 June 2017
Good
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on 12 October 2017
Fantastic book
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on 14 November 2017
Apsalotly brill worth the read
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on 6 August 2017
Great book
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on 13 April 2017
bought this for a friend as I had already read it and was enthralled by it
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on 16 October 2012
I have a friend who wrote: "We are all Trinitarians. But though we confess God as Triune, we may not be Trinitarian in our daily living. Theologian Karl Rahner asks this question, "If we decided to ditch the doctrine of the trinity what practical difference would it make to our lives? Rahner's answer is that it would make no difference at all. He says, "Despite their orthodox confession of the Trinity, Christians are, in their practical lives, almost mere monotheists." The point Rahner is making is that though we confess the three in One we live before God as a Monad, a single and solitary being."

This book, `The Shack Revisited' is an excellent exposition of `Trinitarian theology' which everyone would benefit from reading, but especially those Christians (particularly from the Conservative Evangelical wing of the church) who, whether they realize it or not, are as Rahner describes above Trinitarian in name but not in practice.

For me Baxter Kruger's writings are the most accessible of any `Trinitarian' theologian. Although a scholar of standing himself, Baxter has the ability to explain deep and complex matters simply (a rare gift in a theologian). Standing on the shoulders of giants like St Athanasius, Karl Barth, the Torrance brothers, C.S.Lewis and others, he clearly expounds the wonderful truths of our `inclusion in Christ'. Against the background of `The Shack' Baxter visits every important aspect of Trinitarian theology, including Incarnation and Atonement in a way which every one with a mind to can access and understand. Baxter's writings have revolutionised my own understanding of Christian faith, and I write as a 65 year old Christian and an ordained Church of England minister of some 40 years standing.

My concern is that those who most need to read this book won't do so. They may consider it to be `lightweight' which it certainly isn't (witness the footnotes and recommendations for further reading); and because it is an exposition of the theology which undergirds `The Shack', there are those who having an inbuilt prejudice against that book won't be inclined to read this one. It will be their loss. This book demands a wide readership. To my mind it deserves as wide a readership as `The Shack' itself. My personal hope is that `The Shack Revisited' will bring the writings of C. Baxter Kruger to the attention of readers in the U.K. and therefore expose him to a much wider readership in what he calls `the Motherland'. May this book advance the `Trinitarian' revival in the church and beyond, and may eyes be opened to see how great and good is the Lord Jesus Christ. Jesus said "On that day you will realize that I am in my Father, and you are in me, and I am in you" (John 14:21 TNIV).
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on 11 March 2017
Brilliant read and very encouraging for a Christian
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on 19 October 2017
I found Kruger Baxter's insight on the Shack very helpful. The book the Shack itself is very interesting & insightful. The problem of evil is always problematic for human beings. Did God design humanity & the universe with a fatal flaw that can never be eliminated from his creation? It does seem to be that way as human beings we constantly repeat "fallen history". The author in the Shack wants us to imagine an original world that our heavenly parent imagined & created that didn't fall if that is the right word to use.Only in this way can we go past current paradigms & ways of looking at problems. Personally i feel & believe that God as a heavenly parent did not imagine this turn of events in human history & human nature. He/She saw the possibility but thought that his children would do the right thing that they would safely go through & grow through their growing period safely. So God took a big risk in creating autonomous beings that could use their free will according to their choices. Even though God is omniscient & omnipotent he does not interfere in the human portion of responsibility. It is very much like a human parent who has to stand back when their children are growing up & hope & pray that they make the right decisions that will lead to their happiness & fulfilment. Of course i don't really think that God foresaw how depraved human beings became throughout human history or how off course they would go.. That is why forgiveness became so important to follow God's way both for God himself & for human beings especially for prophets & religious leaders and pioneers of new & better paths for humanity. In a way God as a heavenly parent has to renew his courage, commitment and investment in recovering his original dream & hope for humanity. In some sense God is like a human being or to put it in an other way we are like God because we are his children & object partners of love. God is lonely without his children and thus will continue to reach out to us & restore our true value & original nature.
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