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on 20 December 2010
Frameworks. How many of them we can handle? This book covers Java EE 6 which is a very valuable framework. It is a book for a beginner provided this beginner has knowledge of Java and of the design of enterprise level IT systems in general. There is no place for a 'hello world' example. It is somewhat compact written and guides you along the important aspects of EE6. It is less the complete reference manual of all possible options. You won't get drowned in details, which can be an advantage. It has a hands on approach, as it descibes how to set up an environment to start with Ant and Maven. However, I guess most people will turn to a more integrated development environment such as Netbeans or Eclipse. A little odd: code examples are tested on MS Windows only. I like it.
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on 31 May 2011
I wouldn't buy this book again. I was very disappointed it doesn't cover CDI at all, despite being a major new feature of Java EE 6 I wanted to learn about. I also found the JPA coverage to be patchy. Finally it covers each framework individually (EJB, JSF, JPA) but doesn't touch on how to use them together to achieve something useful.

Overall it's well written at what it covers, but less than useful.
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on 19 March 2011
I've got this book for a couple of weeks now and still I'm half way though it and still think there's something odd about this book.
The approach taken by the author doesn't follow the usual path for beginners guides. Normally I would expect to dive into some front-end technologies (such as JSP in Java's case) and then build the other skills on top of it. Here, we struggle with persistence, database mapping etc. instead... Quite boring for those who just want to get feel of the Java EE.
Finally, pointer for everyone who's already bought this book - go to book's website and check for code updates... if you are using current tools and libraries you probably won't be able compile the book's code! Also even if code in the book looks like a complete listing it may not be so compare it with source-code from author's website if you get compilers errors.
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on 24 July 2011
This is certainly a good book, clearly written and useful to get an overall view of the technologies involved. It is true that it does not go very deep, but again this would require far more than half a thousand pages. If I were to point out one issue, the companion code on the web sometimes requires some tinkering before being truly working.
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on 25 August 2011
I am a beginner programmer and obviously also new to Java EE. To get my head around Java EE I consulted a few manuals including The Java EE 6 Tutorial: v. 1: Basic Concepts (Java Series) and Java EE 6 with GlassFish 3 Application Server. However I found Antonio Goncalves Beginning Java EE Platform with GlassFish 3 by far the best. I is very well written; all new concepts are clearly explained with plenty of relevant examples. I also appreciate his logic bottom-to-top approach starting with the data model tier. If you are new to Java EE, this book is definitely the best comprehensive introduction to the platform.
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on 2 February 2012
Bought on the basis of GlassFish being in the title as it's the Application Server used on an OU course I'm due to start in May.

Told me nothing new about EJB 3.1 or EE6 that I haven't gleaned from EJB 3.1 by O'Reilly or from the Web and the "GlassFish" part I could have got from the Oracle site.
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on 10 March 2015
Value for money. I learned and understood basics of Java EE.
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