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Customer reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars
48
AC/DC: Hell Ain't a Bad Place to Be
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on 4 December 2016
This book is the most 3rd AC/DC book I've read. The first being 2 sides to every glory which I thought was good, the second was The Youngs which to me was very deep and a struggle to read and finish. So, Mick Walls story was great. Made me laugh through most of the book. Excellent read
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on 28 January 2017
Brother loved the book
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on 5 November 2016
A perfect purchase and ideal, for all fans-recommended,totallyA+
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on 9 August 2017
As expected, quick delivery
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on 30 December 2016
Absolutely excellent!
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on 29 January 2016
Great read
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on 1 January 2017
Mick Wall does a great job, could not stop reading!
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on 10 January 2017
Although a detailed and well researched book, there is too much opinion rather than fact in places. Take the death of Bon Scott for example. Nothing new here, just 'perhaps this happened?' But, all in all, a good read for the AC/DC fan if you have some time to kill.
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on 6 December 2012
Mick continues to mature and develop still further as one of the world's finest chroniclers of rock 'n' roll history, even after 30-plus years in the business. His Zep book, 'When Giants Walked The Earth' is already the definitive work for serious readers and the purple patch continues, following the Metallica opus, with this;the hitherto untold tale of bar-room boogie bad boys made international mega-stars, ACDC.
I have to share Mr McIver's view that it took some balls to so firmly focus on the Scott years. With so little of the book left to discuss Brian Johnson there was a very real danger of the the latter quarter seeming rushed and perfunctory. That it is not, in any way, is a testament to Mick's skill and talent as a storyteller.
Rudd's exit is jaw-dropping and is covered quite unlike anyone else's account, with new insights and information that add to the depth and substance of the work.
Mick has a real nose for sniffing out previously unknown facts and weaving them skilfully into his work and so it has proved here again. You think you know the ACDC story? Trust me; not until you've read this, you don't.
Outstanding and essential reading for any serious lover of 20th century contemporary music.
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on 15 June 2015
This is a good book and worth reading if you're a fan of AC/DC - however it is all very much written in Mick Wall's preferred style - which is, basically, to take a great band and then try to demonstrate, admittedly, sometimes quite persuasively, that they're mostly horrible people who've made lots of terrible decisions.

It is extremely well-researched (I think Mick would certainly like us to believe he really has been to Bon Scott's birthplace) and so the conclusions the book reaches are all reasonable enough. I did find reading the book a rather miserable experience though - I had to dig out all my AC/DC records just to remind myself that they were actually really good. The trouble is a large proportion of the book is spent on the Bon Scott years and I felt like I'd been going downhill on a roller coaster for far too long. Mick manages to make the end of that era even more depressing than ever before - though I think his thoughts on the circumstances are probably correct.

Because Mick believes the band basically blew it after Back In Black the narrative never really recovers so the book slowly fizzles out which is a bit unfair on poor Brian Johnson - especially as he is easily one of the most likable characters we get introduced too.

I should point out that the book only goes up to the Black Ice tour - although this is probably a good thing - the book gives Malcolm Young credit for starting and always leading the band - but also highlights out his responsibility for a whole series of strange and bordering on the bizarre decisions - sadly he is now in a nursing home suffering from dementia. I wouldn't want anyone to draw any conclusions from all that.
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