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on 9 April 2015
It was readable but not really believable. I can't see a midwife skidding into a room and working under the bed, or delivering a baby with he backside hanging out of the window. She had so many unusual deliveries in a few weeks it was just too far fetched to read as a diary.
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on 11 August 2014
Would buy again
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on 3 April 2011
I really enjoyed this book, it's like putting on your dressing gown and having a cup of Horlicks - a very easy, comfortable and warming read. It's never going to win awards or change the world, but it does what it says on the tin. It gives you a glimpse of life as a trainee midwife, its chaos, triumphs and very anti-social hours. It also contains a great variety of characters, vivid descriptions of where and how babies are born and the joy and discipline involved. I read it because I loved Jennifer Worth's Midwife Triology. This is not as good, not as well written and not as engaging, but it is a charming read and I was sad when it finished.
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on 10 March 2012
I was a midwife myself, in the East End in the 1960s and I find this book completely unbelievable in many places.
For example, this girl delivered several complicated births - brow presentation, breech, undiagnosed twins - all alone except for the father in some cases (a strict -no-no then) and there was no mention of a doctor being called , let alone her midwife supervisor, who should have been with her in many instances. I cannot believe none of these difficult cases didn't need to be stitched up afterwards! And phone calls then were not a shilling - just a couple of pennies!

There was no mention of shaving, enemas, inducing labour with castor oil and a hot bath -all practised at that time (though now thankfully extinct). I was also horrified that any midwife could come in after a delivery, chuck her bag into the treatment room uncleaned while she had a bath. A dismissable offence back then, no matter how tired the nurse felt.

Finally, I wish I'd kept count of the number of time she said she mumbled!! I wonder anyone understood a thing she said by her own account.
This was not a relaxing read for me, though those who have no experience of the time and work involved might enjoy it. I won't be looking for any more books by this author.
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on 7 April 2017
This is a remarkable, often funny account, of a pupil midwife. So wonderfully written, Dot relates about her time spent trying to reach the target set of delivering 12 babies, so she could take her final exam.

Nothing is ever straight forward, babies appear when they want to and not before.

I really loved this real life account - did she make the 12...? I can't tell you that, you must read the book
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on 3 January 2011
I met Dot whilst waiting to disembark our ferry and she told me about her book - glad I bothered to get a copy - good nostalgic read, reminds me of the tough yet simple times we used to live in back then.
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on 17 February 2011
Bought this for my mum who was a midwife in the 1940's and 50's - she thoroughly enjoyed the nostalgic trip back into her days of nursing. I decided to read it and really enjoyed picturing her at that time.
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on 7 June 2010
I have not yet finished reading 'Twelve Babies on a Bike', but I can honestly say that I am finding it a most enjoyable and fascinating read. I was born at home, during the terrible winter of 1963, so I can relate to a lot of what Dot May Dunn writes - through the stories I've heard from my parents. Her writing style is very easy-going and enjoyable to read, and her feelings for her patients and the newborn babies she delivered shines through. Her life during this period of her training was far from easy, but she did a marvellous job against all the odds and in conditions that now seem almost prehistoric and unbelievable to today's mothers-to-be (and fathers-to-be too, of course!). I am really enjoying this lovely book and cannot recommend it highly enough.
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on 22 March 2011
I really enjoyed this book, we've made so many medical advances with caring for newborns, but poor Dot, just her her bag and her bike....little bit repetitive but interesting,bought another copy for my mum for mother's day.
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on 16 July 2010
I ordered this book last week and I have finished it already. It was a great read and i couldn't put it down. The book is written in the style a diary dated back to the 1950's. I am very interested in the subject of midwifery and found the book very interesting.
I already have a list of friends wanting to lend it. Well worth the money and it arrived the next day after ordering, P&P was also free double bonus.
Happy reading everyone.
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