Learn more Download now Shop now Learn more Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Learn More Shop now Shop now Learn more Shop Fire Shop Kindle New album - Eminem Shop now Shop now



on 8 October 2014
I thought it was excellent and described India especially Delhi very well a very interesting book. Sometimes the chapters did not follow each other & I had to go back to find out who the characters were. Very good.
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you? Report abuse
on 29 March 2013
I was very disappointed that I could not find the illustrations. The list of illustrations looks very interesting , so big disappointment.
0Comment| One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Report abuse
on 31 May 2016
Meant to read this years ago but never got round to it. Incredibly illuminating, detailed and readable. What an achievement! The final few pages are especially relevant to problems now facing the world.
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you? Report abuse
on 4 February 2016
The book is is well researched and well written and uses the translations of the "Mutiny papers" (first hand accounts) to tell the story of the rebellion against the British East India Company in 1857.

But as other reviewers have said, the book is marred by its pro-Mughal and Islamic bias and revisionist history, like the characterization of the Mughals as 'tolerant' and 'progressive'. William has been criticized as an apologist for Islamism, who is even praising the "tolerance" of an Aurangzeb, as Francois Gautier once remarked. He has been described as an upscale Barbara Cartland by Hugh Fitzgerald, who is "singing the life of luxe and volupté at the Mughal court", all the while denying and ignoring the atrocities that were inflicted upon the Hindus by the Mughals. He even condemned Nobel prize winner V.S. Naipaul for writing that Hinduism is a “wounded civilization”, viz. wounded by Islam. This and his support for the St. Thomas legend was criticized by other historians like Koenraad Elst.

The extensive research that went into this book makes it an interesting read, but to gain a complete and more objective knowledge of the Mughal period, I'd recommend to supplement it with some of the books of Sita Ram Goel, R.C. Majumdar, K.S. Lal, Meenakshi Jain or Jadunath Sarkar. All in all, I find Dalrymple's travel books, especially "Nine Lives", more interesting than his books on Islamic and Mughal history, which are too biased for a history book.
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you? Report abuse
on 28 February 2007
Review of The Last Mughal by William Dalrymple

Dalrymple's The Last Mughal, is a historical masterpiece. The events of the 1857 Indian Mutiny are seen amidst a backdrop of a gallery of characters -of high officials and common soldiers, of noble men and cunning politicians, of faint-hearted princes and desperate liars. Dalrymple has recreated the event making as many participants as he could discover come alive. The reader feels intermittently for both the Muslims and the English with deep empathy and horror alike.

The circumstances -meticulously recreated from a vast array of primary sources are made unbelievably real. We hear voices of editors, glimpse diaries of soldiers, read portions of letters from wives to their husbands, observe Ghalib's heart break, see princes turn to paupers while watching the inevitable fall of a great dynasty. He unfolds the events to the reader slowly, and then picks up the pace as stakes rise for all sides concerned, till political reverberations create a monster that will relish death and destruction and no one--not the king of the Mughals or the empress of England can prevent it from running its course. The monster has its way, and the reader suddenly realizes how quickly time changes the course of history.

But Dalyrmple is more than a historian. He exposes his heart at the trials of the Muslims and laments their loss at the hands of the British. In so doing, he allows readers to glimpse the beauty of Islam through Muslim poetry, its refined culture, its bricks and stones of mosques and palaces, many that will eventually be blown and shattered by an ignorant vengeance. In so doing, he is drawing a stark parallel to the world of today. The ordinary Muslim, like the one in Delhi in 1857, must duck for cover and watch helplessly as ignorance grabs isolated events in an attempt to shatter the foundations not just of a very beautiful religion and culture, but his very soul.
0Comment| 4 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Report abuse
on 13 April 2013
Brilliant book, very readable and excellently researched. The illustrations would have added greatly to my enjoyment but do not seem to be available from my Kindle edition.
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you? Report abuse
on 21 August 2014
I'm sorry there are only five stars to give - this book is superb, thought provoking and beautifully written. The use of new source material is particularly striking.
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you? Report abuse
on 2 January 2017
as described
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you? Report abuse
on 21 July 2016
Well written - shows the patchwork nature of different forces at work. Reflective of current affairs to - their complexity and of peoples biased views.
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you? Report abuse
on 24 April 2014
Like all his books a good read with interest and facts combined.Interesting pictures painted of a long gone time and the results of the actions taken.
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you? Report abuse

Sponsored Links

  (What is this?)