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VINE VOICEon 20 September 2009
I have to admit that I am strangely fascinated by the UFO myths and legends that have become a part of our cultural folklore. I have no idea what they are or where they come from and remain an interested sceptic.

This book gives a straighforward account of the history of UFOs over the last one hundred years or so. It's an easy read but this isn't a criticism - it gives plenty of detail too with original documentation to back up the evidence collected. What I liked was that the author didn't strive to put across any personal POV whilst giving lots of information allowing the reader to draw their own conclusions. Some other UFO books have proved to be very hard going, almost over-laden with detail as every eye-witness account is described in minute detail, this book manages to be clear and informative but not dull.

For anyone with an interest in the subject I'd recommend this as a welcome addition to the more reputable books available.
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on 25 April 2011
Now that the MoD has lost funding for the UFO desk, details of previously undisclosed sightings have been revealed to the British public, many in this unbiased, straight-down-the middle, non-judgemental anthology. Apparently, the majority of early UFOs were cigar-shaped - a ploy of Churchill's I pondered? Compiled in date order and illustrated with copies of original RAF and MoD paperwork raised at the time, it leaves the readers to make their own decisions as to the validity of each claim. My 1991 sighting was not included, much to my chagrin, but the sheer volume of unexplained encounters world-wide leaves the impression that there surely IS something out there!
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on 21 June 2010
I rate this book alongside Clarke and Robert's "Flying Saucerers - a Social History of UFOlogy" as one of the best works on this subject. David Clarke takes an objective look at reports and other documents recently, or not so recently, made available from the National Archives of the UK, and leaves their interpretation to the reader. Some are suspect, others unavoidably puzzling, whether you are a sceptic or a "believer" - and it seems "to believe or not to believe" is an overtly simplistic approach to this subject. From reading this book you might just conclude there is indeed "something" there.
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on 9 October 2012
Interesting run through the history of UFO sightings and cultural shifts in attitudes towards the unexplained during the last century . The central stem is the releasing of files from the national archives . An interesting coffee table read .
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on 12 February 2017
The best book on the subject apart from The Hunt For Zero Point, No aliens hear just good reporting on the subject with info on lighter than air crafts with modern light and strong materials as well as the stealth of modern flying crafts such as the B.2. Northrop Bomber. Even information on Project Winter-haven from the early 1950.s connected with Thomas Townsend Brown. Shows the disinformation of the media and the military to keep high tack technology secret. Highly recommended.
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on 25 November 2009
David Clark is one of the best UFO authors this country has ever produced, he might not be the best known but that is mainly because his work is based on solid factual research. You won't find too many 'space aliens stole my baby,' kind of claims here, but you will learn a lot about events that lead to UFO reports, and you'll get intelligent and solid investigations of Britain's best known UFO cases. One of most welcome things about this book is the way it's written in a no-nonsense, informative style. A lot of other UFO books appear to think breathless claims and rambling arguments are the way to go.
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on 31 July 2013
This is a disappointing read that doesn't live up to its billing. The author is very keen to emphasise his role in pressuring the British to release confidential files on UFOs, and the descriptions of sightings come from these files. But ultimately, although written by an academic specialising in the field, there is no analysis of the UFO phenomenon, but simply another slightly tedious and poorly structured book on UFOs that presents descriptions of sightings that add nothing to our understanding of the subject. A more interesting alternative is Leslie Keane's UFOs, which although written by an investigative journalist, is more analytical in its approach to this subject.
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on 27 July 2013
I was expecting a really fascinating read here. instead we have a few black & white illustrations ,no great stories about cover ups conspiracy theories ,all the stuff that makes this subject so interesting.
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on 5 February 2014
Wanted to read something a little different. It has a broad coverage of the subject and was pretty much what I expected. Interesting to read a little about 'official' recording and coverage.
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on 27 April 2014
Yes, well, I would like to believe the content, but cannot - and I would like to see a better balanced summary of the so called evidence.
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