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4.2 out of 5 stars
10
4.2 out of 5 stars
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on 17 October 2012
My son recently startd working on the Anthony Browne books at school before this I had never heared of them. When I bought this book for him I was at first disappointed as I thought the writing was too big and the story too short for him as he is nearly 8 and has a high standard of reading. However, after reading the book with him a few times I realised how meaningful the stories are and how well written. We have since bought 2 more from the Anthony Browne range and am equally impressed with the way they are written and the messages they hold.
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on 27 May 2015
my kids remember this book from when they were small, and love it now for their children.
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on 16 April 2016
in good condition
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on 2 January 2017
Unfortunately this was an old library book which wasn't suitable for my usage
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on 21 July 2007
The things we (myself and my son) love about this book are the pictures. Don't get me wrong, the storyline is perfectly ok, but the pictures have all sorts of interest in them that you can investigate with you child, such as why there are two ears halfway up a house wall? The same picture has a little face at the top of a drain pipe, which is a great idea and part of the plan (I think) to really pad out the experience of reading a book for a young child. Fun for me too.
Best part of the book is the last page where the show-off Jeremy has gone off to the zoo with his father leaving main-character Sam absorbing the wonders of nature in the forest: the picture of the forest we see has Sam in the foreground looking at a wood filled with hidden shapes of animals like owls, cats, sheep, toads, alligators, deer, etc-very clever and absorbing. Impression overall? Superb; and it really engages a child's imagination. Does the same for tired parents too!
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on 31 October 2014
GOOD BOOK
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on 14 October 2001
This book is probably best used for key stage one readers, as it has a fairly simple language content. The children may relate to Sam, and they will definately find the story funny. The humour used includes Jeremy falling off his bike, and other such incidents which the children will laugh at. The illustrations are very active, and I'm sure children would love getting involved with the book!
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on 23 October 2013
"Mum! Mum! Why are there ears on this wall?"
"Oh, where dear?"
"Here Mum, in my book."
"Oh yes, I see. Well, Esmerelda, it's just an old saying."
"What old saying, Mum?"
"Oh, ... just an old saying about walls having ears."
"But Mum, walls DON'T have ears."
"Well, no, not quite like that. It means ... well, it means someone may be listening."
"Eh, Mum? Listening to me?"
"Well, I suppose just listening to anyone."
"Ooh! I don't like that ... Hello, Daddy!"
"Oh, hello Esmerelda!"
"You had a good day at work, dear?"
"Hello Jane. Well, no, not really."
"No? Why not?"
"Well, we've got the new surveillance cameras installed in the High Street, but they're still not working properly. I'm going to be meeting the council tomorrow afternoon."
"Look, Daddy. Look at my book. These walls have got ears!"
"What? Ears? Oh my goodness! What the hell is that?"

And that rather severe reaction marks my point of departure with this book, which my granddaughter recently brought home from school. Children's fairy tales are traditionally packed full of monsters and menaces, but they tend to be departures from the real world. Therefore, a park-keeper who looks very much like Adolf Hitler is on the one hand a comic stereotypical image, but on the other a real threat - anyone in uniform becomes a threat. And if the young child gradually makes the association with the Führer, and learns about National Socialism and the Third Reich, then doesn't the comic gesture in the book eventually breed fear, suspicion and possibly xenophobia?

The world is full of strangeness, and of potential and real danger, but it's also a wonderful place to inhabit, full of variety and diversity. By all means let's amuse our children as they learn, but let's be a little careful about the connections they might make.
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on 29 June 2010
My two year old and three and a half love this book and I love reading it to them. There are so many visual jokes (man's trunk, tree trunk) and running themes - is there a cat on this page. And in the end the baddy gets his come-uppance and the hero gets a lovely walk in the woods with his imagination.
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on 9 July 2014
Book arrived as described on time
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