Shop now Shop now Shop now  Up to 70% Off Fashion  Shop all Amazon Fashion Cloud Drive Photos Shop now Learn More Shop now Shop now Shop Fire Shop Kindle Shop now Shop now

Customer Reviews

3.9 out of 5 stars
11
3.9 out of 5 stars
Format: Paperback|Change
Price:£8.99+ Free shipping with Amazon Prime
Your rating(Clear)Rate this item


There was a problem filtering reviews right now. Please try again later.

on 7 August 2015
“Tintin in the Land of the Soviets” is the very first Tintin adventure, written and illustrated by Georges Remi alias Hergé. It was originally serialized in Le Petit Vingtième, a Belgian Catholic childrens' magazine, in 1929. Tintin is depicted as a brave reporter for Le Petit Vingtième sent to the Soviet Union to expose the depredations of the Bolshevik regime. His only companion is the dog Milou (Snowy in later English translations). None of the other colorful characters of the Tintin universe had been invented. Tintin is depicted as a heroic boy scout with Christian morality, but he is also pretty good at roughing up the bad guys with his fists.

The plot is wafer thin, and essentially revolves around Tintin running around the Soviet Union with Bolshevik agents at his tail. The slapstick element, the constant jail breaks and Milou intervening to save the hero's life would all become staples of later Tintin adventures, but overall this is a quite bad story, interesting only because of Hergé's later fame. Indeed, after Hergé had become a household name, he actually prohibited republication of “Tintin in the Land of the Soviets”. When the story finally reappeared, it was in the original black-and-white version, since Hergé hadn't bothered rebranding it in color.

The politics of “Tintin in the Land of the Soviets” are equally crude, but nothing else could be expected from an anti-Communist propaganda story published in a Belgian childrens' magazine in 1929! Even certified anti-Communists will find the story's factual mistakes and anachronisms somewhat embarrasing, as when the secret police is still called by its Civil War name “Cheka” or when one Bolshevik exclaims “By Lenin, Trotsky and Stalin”. Trotsky and Stalin were, of course, factional opponents. Hergé's main source of inspiration was the book “Moscou sans Voiles” by one Joseph Douillet, remembered today only because of his book's chance influence on Tintin.

Despite its rookie character, “Tintin au pays des Soviets” became a commercial success, and the rest is history…
0Comment| One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 19 October 2012
This story is entirely in black and white with simple outline drawings. Like the early episodes of the Simpsons, characters are recognisable but the style is still forming and growing. Tintin has a much rounder head and there is less definition in the character's features. However, the simplistic method and the monochrome texture means you don't stop to admire the view and are whisked along by the story.

It was originally a newspaper comic strip so the regular cliff-hangers mean that Tintin is getting shot at, blown-up, or in car crashes every other page. Whilst this gets a bit fatiguing after a while it means the story moves along at a fair old pace. You won't get bored and can finish the book very quickly.

Herge wrote this in 1929 meaning the politics are just as black and white as the pictures. The Soviets are evil. Like the Nazis in Indiana Jones they have no redeeming features. This conjures the feel of an old Saturday Morning serial like Flash Gordon or Buck Rogers. Much of the humour wouldn't look out of place in a Charlie Chaplin movie either. This is definitely a fascinating snapshot of a bygone era and quite an accomplishment for a 22 year old amateur with no formal art training. Whilst the English translation can sometimes get a bit patchy it is still an interesting read.

Thumbs Up!
0Comment| 3 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 20 February 2014
Good as a collector's item, but not much like the more well-known books. These are as they were originally serialised in Le Petit Vingtieme, and as such they're short bursts of things happening without a lot of the character interaction or detailed artwork found in the later Tintin stories.

In summary, this feels more like a collection-completer than a new Tintin adventure, so if that's what you're after, go for it.
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 1 November 2014
My son loves it - its an oldie, but as a big Tintin fan he loves it and it makes a good prt of the collection. Turned up in good time in good nick - nuff said
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 11 January 2015
SORRY CAN'T ANSWER THE QUESTION AS IT WAS SEND TO INDONESIA FOR A LITTLE GIRLS CHRISTMAS PRESENT. SHE LOVES TINTIN
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 13 September 2014
A beautiful adventure of TIN TIN I could not find in Greece.
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 20 October 2014
bought this for my son, he's a huge Tin Tin fan!
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 23 March 2016
Came quickly and exactly as advertised.
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 28 May 2016
Very good read cover to cover a week.
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 26 April 2016
Nice
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse