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on 3 July 2017
Lovely glossy hardcover. Tim Tin up to his tricks as usual.
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on 18 July 2017
Great book.
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on 4 October 2017
bought for a present but looked good.
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on 6 March 2017
Another very good Tintin.
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on 20 October 2017
My grandson loves all the Tin Tin Books
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on 8 December 2017
As described
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on 15 December 2011
We have bought lots of these books and our children keep requesting more (ages 7, 9 and 10). They are an excellent way of encouraging a reluctant reader, although they all seem to love them (boys and girl)
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VINE VOICEon 10 April 2009
This 1958 story (original title in Belgium: Coke en stock/cokes in voorraad) is a good place to start, or to give to someone else to get a first taste of a wonderful Tintin series. It has everything in a single volume: slapstick, adventure, exotic locations (Wadesdah, Petra) as well as homely ones (Captain Haddock's castle), evil adversaries, good friends, daring escapes; and the illustrator at the top of his form with crisp, clear drawings, beautiful coloring, excellent ship and airplane scenes. And for the loyal Tintin fan there are a host of old friends and acquaintances: general Alcazar, Abdullah, Dawson (from the Blue Lotus), d'Oliveira, Castafiore... and some surprising ones, too, which I won't give away so as not to spoil the surprise.

It is a story of its time, with Mosquitoes and DC-3s very 1950-s cars, and rather 1950-s treatment of `foreigners'; but Hergé's heart is in the right place with his feelings about arms dealers and slave traders. The book has an old-fashioned charm, but is also rather timeless and modern kids would enjoy it, I think.

I believe Hergé reached his peak in this and the two adjacent stories, the Calculus Affair and Tintin in Tibet. The perfect balance between jokes and adventure, good (the freeing of the slaves) and evil, and the perfect handling of colour, story and page lay-out, makes this an absolute topper.
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on 15 July 2009
Tinitn and every Tintin book is a work of genuis (all right the TV spin off books are a bit pants)but all of the originals are the ideal Big brother/ Dad reading a bed time story. My father did them all with me and i am doing them with my son.

The sheer joy they bring to bedtime for me and my son is imeasurable.
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on 24 April 2010
This book is definitely the best of the Tintin series, and could even be my all-time favourite graphic novel. Believe me, I've read a few as well.
Herge's novels are never boring. Even when Tintin, Captain Haddock or any of their comrades aren't in peril, there's something to amuse or amaze in there. But The Red Sea Sharks takes it to a new level.
Tintin always seems to stumble upon adventure in the most ordinary places. In this case, it begins in front of a movie theatre, and running into old friend General Alcazar. Next comes a misplaced wallet that can't be returned and the reappearance of the endlessly impish Prince Abdullah (son of the Emir of Khemed) at Marlinspike Hall. But then things go from trying to chilling when Tintin finds out that General Alcazar was in Europe buying up military hardware from an illicit supplier. Tintin is compelled to intervene when this supplier helps to back a coup in Khemed and the Emir goes into hiding.
It's everything you expect from a Tintin novel; laughs take the form of such things as Abdullah's practical jokes, Captain Haddock's attempt at horse-riding, Snowy stealing dinner from a cheetah and a confusion of orders leading to rebel pilots firing on their troops. But it's the exciting parts that win me over. You could swear you're watching a movie rather than reading a book. The book shifts through a plane crash, a flight through the desert, an aerial attack in the middle of the sea, the exposure of a shocking illicit trade in human lives, and it all finally climaxes in a nail-biting cat-and-mouse chase between an old freighter and a lethal submarine.
Buy it. You shall not be disappointed.
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