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on 13 March 2006
The Writer's Handbook provides the comprehensive listings writers need, including publishers, literary agents, writers' courses and prizes. These are interspersed with useful essays, eg about tax and the writer. Much of this information is invaluable; a couple of hours' research on, for example, literary agents or publishers may save you months of wasted effort submitting work to unsuitable recipients. If you're serious about getting published, you need either this or the "Writers' and Artists' Yearbook".
Which is better? Personally, I prefer the Writer's Handbook . But in terms of content, there's not a great deal between them. If you're unsure, check out both in a bookstore and see which layout and style you prefer.
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on 23 October 2005
If you're in any way serious about writing and live in the British Isles, there are two books you need to buy every year - "Writers' and Artists' Yearbook" and "The Writer's Handbook". Why? and what do I mean by 'serious about writing'?
People start writing for a variety of reasons - fun, love, therapy. It's a progressive illness. At some stage, you decide you'd like to improve your skills ... or come to the conclusion that other people might benefit from hearing your words! You join a writers' group, take classes, or start sending your poems, short stories, manuscripts, or articles to publishers. It's before this stage you have to get serious. If you want to improve your writing and have at least the ambition to get published, then I'd suggest you learn a little about marketing before you start sending out material on spec.
If you were to compare the two, "Writers' and Artists' Yearbook" is probably the better value. Both contain page after page of addresses - UK newspapers and magazines, publishers, agents, competitions, etc., etc., etc., complete with pen portraits of these. Both books offer a number of articles on the subject of writing and publication. The "Yearbook" is slightly better - it provides a broader range of information.
"The Handbook", however, scores in its listings information. When it comes to listings of publications and publishers, the two books do not entirely overlap - they have a number of different listings, they offer a different perspective, and it's worth having both on your bookshelf - and if you want to break in to American markets, you should also consider "Writer's Market". In some respects, you may find the listings in "The Handbook" more informative, and editor Barry Turner offers some excellent analyses of the types of material favoured by various editors and publishers.
Well laid out, comprehensive, easily comprehensible, "The Handbook" has been going for years and provides a trustworthy package for beginner and professional alike. The material is concise, easily digested, and in the last nine years I've failed to find a mistake in any of the copies I've bought. For an annual publication, its information is accurate, timely, and accessible. (The same is true of its rival.) If you're serious about writing, it will become a good friend, to be cherished and handled with due care ... though it will inevitably end up a bit dog-eared and threadbare, like a beloved teddybear.
If you're serious enough to believe that you'd like to push your writing to the ultimate conclusion and try to earn money (if not a living) from it, then you will need both books, and you should get into the annual habit of buying them.
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on 3 July 2006
I'd like to point out that this book is not a self-help book for amateur writers and neophytes. I was allowed the impression that this book would afford this. I should have known better; this book is an annual event which serves to throw names, numbers and addresses at those who already have work to submit. But, ne'ermind. It is comprehensive and extremely detailed. It's the business side of writing that writers generally don't want to waste their energy researching. So here it all is: publishers, agents, prizes, organisations, courses and much more. This book will most certainly save you time and energy, and possibly money and sanity too. For the tenner that I paid, it beats a crate of Red Bull and a box of Prozac.
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on 19 October 2005
If you're in any way serious about writing and live in the British Isles, there are two books you need to buy every year - "Writers' and Artists' Yearbook" and "The Writer's Handbook". Why? and what do I mean by 'serious about writing'?
People start writing for a variety of reasons - fun, love, therapy. It's a progressive illness. At some stage, you decide you'd like to improve your skills ... or come to the conclusion that other people might benefit from hearing your words! You join a writers' group, take classes, or start sending your poems, short stories, manuscripts, or articles to publishers. It's before this stage you have to get serious. If you want to improve your writing and have at least the ambition to get published, then I'd suggest you learn a little about marketing before you start sending out material on spec.
If you were to compare the two, "Writers' and Artists' Yearbook" is probably the better value. Both contain page after page of addresses - UK newspapers and magazines, publishers, agents, competitions, etc., etc., etc., complete with pen portraits of these. Both books offer a number of articles on the subject of writing and publication. The "Yearbook" is slightly better - it provides a broader range of information.
"The Handbook", however, scores in its listings information. When it comes to listings of publications and publishers, the two books do not entirely overlap - they have a number of different listings, they offer a different perspective, and it's worth having both on your bookshelf - and if you want to break in to American markets, you should also consider "Writer's Market". In some respects, you may find the listings in "The Handbook" more informative, and editor Barry Turner offers some excellent analyses of the types of material favoured by various editors and publishers.
Well laid out, comprehensive, easily comprehensible, "The Handbook" has been going for years and provides a trustworthy package for beginner and professional alike. The material is concise, easily digested, and in the last nine years I've failed to find a mistake in any of the copies I've bought. For an annual publication, its information is accurate, timely, and accessible. (The same is true of its rival.) If you're serious about writing, it will become a good friend, to be cherished and handled with due care ... though it will inevitably end up a bit dog-eared and threadbare, like a beloved teddybear.
If you're serious enough to believe that you'd like to push your writing to the ultimate conclusion and try to earn money (if not a living) from it, then you will need both books, and you should get into the annual habit of buying them.
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on 8 March 2006
I am turning to this book regularly so it has already earned its keep.
0Comment| 9 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse


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