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on 29 May 2018
This a consummate writer, elegant, polished prose A story line that feels like an iced fruit juice on a hot day! I had great difficulty in putting this story down once I had started it; in fact I read it in two bites, playing havoc with my schedule for the rest of the day. Written in journal form it avoids padding and diversion from the theme. If you are still not convinced of its worth then take heed to my heartfelt recommendation.
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on 7 February 2016
I enjoyed this very much. It is really no more than Pride & Prejudice told through Darcy's eyes, but it is well done and, unlike others I have read, fairly convincing. The only slight issue I would take with the storyline is that Darcy really does seem as arrogant and unpleasant as Elizabeth first believes him to, up to the point of the proposal at Hunsford when he begins to mend his ways. In the original, the interlude with the housekeeper at Pemberley makes it fairly clear that was not really the case (but of course this part is excluded from this book as Darcy would not have been privy to it).However, overall I found this a very satisfying read, although if you prefer the more outrageous P&P offerings, it is probably not for you.
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on 11 November 2010
I love Jane Austen's 'Pride & Prejudice' - it's one of my all-time favourite books. When I discovered the world of P&P sequels, retellings and other spinoffs, I was very excited - but quickly found that the quality of the books in this world ranged from ridiculously raunchy to hopelessly boring. To each their own - it really depends on the reader's tastes, and mine are a bit conservative where these adaptations are concerned - I like them to stay true to Austen's vision and characters, and I don't like it when the writer takes too many liberties with the 'core elements' of the book. I've read quite a few of these books, and I particularly liked Pamela Aidan's series (although I skipped over the second book in the series) - but I have to say that Mary Street's book is my favourite adapatation so far. I love the fact that it's written from Mr Darcy's point of view (I love Mr Darcy!), but also that it's not too long-winded and doesn't veer off into strange flights of fancy, the way some other P&P adapatations tend to.

It's not a perfect book by any means, but it's well-written, nicely paced and best of all, it offers some interesting insights and perspectives where Mr. Darcy is concerned. Mary Street proffers some nice ideas on why Darcy does (and says) some of the things he does in the book - I won't reveal them here so as not to spoil the book for anyone, but they're almost all plausible and interesting to read. One or two I found a bit jarring, but not horribly so. I love that Mr Darcy in this book is recognisable as the Darcy from the original book, and I really enjoyed the writer's refined, but not excessively formal, style.

All in all, I found this a very enjoyable read - not particularly exciting perhaps, but very enjoyable and a great reminder of why I fell in love with Austen's original.
3 people found this helpful
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on 7 September 2014
This is definitely one of the best P&P adaptations available, in my opinion, and I thoroughly recommend it!
It is well written and in a style wholly suited to P&P, making it a plausible and enjoyable read, and one far superior to many of the P&P adaptations out there!
At last we get inside Mr Darcy's head. We are treated to a view of the whole tale direct from the man himself, since it is written in the first person. Now we are given all the reasons WHY he says and does all that we read of him in the original P&P, gaining personal insight into the delightful, charming, and not, after all, insensitive, man behind the haughty mask.
It is a book I could (and probably will) read again and again.
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on 23 November 2015
Three cheers for a JAff book mercifully free from howlers and modern Americanisms! [They never fail to wreck the illusion of being in Regency England ] I particularly enjoyed the expanded version of Darcy's scene with Lady Catherine which is tantalisingly referred to by J.A. More, please
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on 14 January 2016
Wonderful read; very true to P&P. A few Americanisms, such as 'fall' rather than autumn, and 'oh my!' but forgivable. I would recommend all JA followers to read this delightful story.
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on 14 April 2013
I would wholeheartedly recommend this book for any Pride and Prejudice fan. It is well written and captures your imagination immediately. Whilst some of the situations are different it was interesting to read from Mr Darcy' s viewpoint. I was not disappointed and will be looking for more books written by same author.
One person found this helpful
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on 10 June 2010
This is a delightful book and I really enjoyed it. I've read other books based around Pride and Prejudice and the characters don't always feel right but the characters in this story really worked for me.
I would recommend it for any P and P fan.
2 people found this helpful
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on 4 January 2013
this isn't so much of a review as a tale of pride. Mary street was my paternal grandmother and I am extremely proud to be her granddaughter. Her love of books has been transferred from her to me and whilst I was growing up she would always have a funny tale to tell me before bedtime. I just wish she was here to read all of your feedback but I know that she'd be appreciative of it anyway. R.I.P grandma.
2 people found this helpful
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on 9 August 2010
This is my favourite Pride and Prejudice offshoot, and the one which is a close companion to the original.The author shows an excellent understanding of Jane Austin's characters. Well recommended.
One person found this helpful
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