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on 30 July 2010
I was glad to see I am not the only one to be taken aback by the writing style the author has adopted, perhaps imagining it to be a pastiche of Austen. It is not, it is almost impenetrable at times, and many usages are either simply incorrect, americanisms or anachronisms (Elizabeth has a duvet on her bed for heaven's sake!) There is as usual a continual misuse of "shall" and "will" (many especially US authors seem to imagine that simply by using "shall" on every occasion where modern usage would employ "will" they are adopting Regency style. The two are strictly delineated in Regency usage.)
The author also seems unaware of how society at the time worked, how a great estate was operated and what work the various servants actually did (coachmen and footmen are not synonymous, and British estates didn't have overseers for example - it's not a US cotton plantation!) Another comment has pointed out the faulty geography, and I noticed the faulty seasons and agricultural practice. The idea that it might be possible to picnic and make love in the open air during the lambing season in Derbyshire, or that one might have hunted foxes at this time caused me some amusement as I live there!
Reading the book is hard work, and it is long. Somewhere in there could have been an amusing tale, but it is drowned under the weight of all those words. Cut by a decent editor to half its length (or even less) it might have succeeded in capturing attention. I'm sorry I wasted my money on it. I usually enjoy these sorts of sequel, and there are a number of very decent ones around, written by people who can actually write correct Regency prose.
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TOP 500 REVIEWERon 25 August 2008
I've never been a great fan of continuations to Austen but this is a particularly dire example of the genre. More Carry On film (`oo-err Mr Darcy!') than P&P, Mr Darcy does quite literally `take' a wife: in bed, in the bath, on the floor etc etc. I'm not an Austen purist by any means (and if you are, avoid this book at all costs), and adored the sly satire and outrageous humour of `Pride and Promiscuity'. However this is prurient, repetitive and completely unerotic; and written in some of the worst prose I have ever read in my life: "hitherto, Elizabeth would have been in concern for Jane's discombobulation. But in that it otherwise spared the conversation her dear sister's enquiry as to whither Lydia journeyed during coition, she fretted not." Indeed! And there are another 464 pages full of stuff like this....
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on 1 March 2013
The book seems to be wriitten by someone living their fantasy's through Elizabeth Bennet. I lasted until she arrived home with Mr Darcy. Having had sex yet again in the carridge on the drive to the House. Enough!
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on 1 January 2012
I really was prepared for a light-hearted and sexy take on Jane Austen's Pride and Prejudice. It wasn't long before I became extremely irritated with the author's attempt to .mimic 19th century English but the whole attempt was blown out of the water when she talked about "Bangs" when she was talking about hair. A modern Americanism if ever there was one. I gave up shortly after that.
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on 30 December 2013
I cannot even begin to find the words to describe how mindbogglingly truly awful a read this book was, perhaps she should have called it 'Mr Darcy Takes his wife Again and Again and Again...'. It takes a very talented writer to write convincing and erotic sex scenes and Berdoll just does not have what it takes - unless you're a pubescent virgin.

The other problem is that she has no concept of early 19th century English speech patterns and expressions so her dialogue really grates and when she measures the distance the sisters live from each other in blocks and has no idea of distance between counties it becomes clear what a very lazy researcher she really is. In fact this woman has no business writing historical novels - I ask you, crinolines and duvets in Regency England?

I don't understand the obsession that some of these North American women have with the regency period, but unless they are prepared to undertake some basic research into the era, they should really stick to what they know. In the case of Ms Berdoll, she writes like someone who has never left a Texan Ranch.

As for the plot, what plot? My book went into the recycle bin in order to make good use of the paper.
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on 19 October 2009
Miss Austen must be causing earthquakes with her spinning from this so called continuation of her master piece. Where she focused on Darcy falling in love with the wit and the eyes of Lizzie, this novel focuses on his love for the carnal pleasures. Suffice to say that there's a romp on just about every other page. And although I am sure I did believe Mr Darcy to have passions... this is just a tad too much. It is a bored housewife's dreambook, I guess, but for those of us who appreciated Miss Austen for her intelligence, and her ability to read and describe characters, this one falls so short of the mark it is firmly embedded in the gutter.
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on 20 January 2007
DONT READ THIS BOOK WHAT EVERY YOU DO !!! i did and it has ruined everyting I loved about Pride and Prejudice. Jane Austen would be appauled at the amount of nudity and sexual content that goes on in this book. the things that go one would never happen in a million years between Darcy and Lizzie. i wouldnt even give this book one star but as i have to, i have only given it one. if you read this book, then i hope that you are prepared for all of the consequences. the auther hasnt reserched england properly, e.g she thinks it is possible that someone could walk from portsmouth to derbyshire in half a day! and dont get me started on her attempt to do old english language. i couldnt understand most of the things that they were trying to say. it is also very bitty and skips all over the place, so you dont know if is the day after the wedding, or six months after the wedding! the new characters that were introduced - well, i didnt even bother reading about them. i struggled my way through this book.

The things which happen to Mr. Darcy and Lizzy, no i'm sorry, they would never have happened, i dont know what this woman thought she was doing, but she has just ruined the most beautiful love story ever. i will never forgive her, never !!! (what has she done)

DONT READ THIS BOOK!!!!! AND WHAT EVER YOU DO DONT READ THE SEQUAL'S SEQUAL!
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on 6 July 2010
A great idea but not carried out successfully. I bought this and the sequel and managed to read all of the first (only because I don't like leaving a book unread) but only got halfway through the second before giving up because life is just too short to read bad books!

It could have been great - but it wasn't.
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on 26 April 2010
I didnt like this book. I know that I felt a little frustrated with Jane Austen for not giving us any real romantic moments between Darcy and Elizabeth but this book went completely over the top with details of bonking every other page until it became quite boring. I WISH I HADNT BOTHERED BUYING OR READING IT.
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on 24 January 2007
It is a truth universally acknowledged that our classic stories should not have "sequels", but should remain as one off, excellent examples of written beauty. The shades of Pemberley should not be polluted by Americanisms and continual reference to male appendages, let alone an obvious failing to understand that in England a married woman never keeps her maiden name and adds it to her husband's. I will concede that the characterisation of the Darcy's was true to the original, which was interesting and kept me reading. I am not, like Lady Catherine, "most seriously displeased", but I am saddened that an English editor didn't see the book before it went to print. Overall, a jolly good romp that was let down by some poor editing.
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