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on 21 August 2017
I like spectacles, they help me to read.
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on 10 June 2017
book in very good condition
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on 23 August 2017
a deep read
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on 19 April 2012
This is an attractively presented edition of Debord's excellent neo-Marxian critique of capitalism, including an interesting new introduction. Two elements of Debord's brief masterpiece stood out, to me at least, as particularly relevant in the contemporary context:

(1) His warning (in 1968) that the rise of the service sector in the West and the shift of manufacturing to the East did not signal the emergence of a classless society, but rather the penetration of 'factory-like' working conditions into the new 'white collar' jobs being created and, ultimately, the intensification, rather than the resolution, of class antagonisms and exploitation. The global financial crisis (and specifically the implications of the various 'austerity measures' for 'ordinary' working people), along with the 'Occupy' protests ('the 99%' versus 'the 1%' etc) would seem to bear this argument out.

(2) The idea of the spectacle as 'a social relation between people that is mediated by images' has never been more relevant than in the age of Facebook, iPads and 24-hour rolling news - from 9/11 to the 'Arab Spring', the twenty-first century has proven that the society of the spectacle is still very much alive today.

A book well-worth reading.
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on 30 January 2016
Fascinating read
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on 2 December 2008
The opening couple of chapters introduce the interesting idea of the 'spectacle'. Unfortunately this is never really explained and after chapter 4 we are left with nothing more than a discourse of marxism, anarchism (which is dismissed by Debord) and the struggle between the proles and the bourgeois...which did not interest me at all.

Unless you are a student of 19th century class struggle there is little of interest here.
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on 9 November 2006
This book - in conjunction with some secondary literature and other NOT RANDOM situ texts - is one of the few which can come to revolutionise your perception ALL THE WAY DOWN. Of course : it is obscure and relies on a familiarity with alot of marxist terminology - but it bares, and demands, repeated readings which demonstrates how these concepts have alot of life in them! If I was to formulate its thesis then today it would be : you are always watching others do things instead of doing something which would exceed the gaze of another watching you. This is the road towards de-reification et al...
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on 19 July 2016
The most pretentious load of meaningless blather I have ever encountered. The guy is a pseudo-intellectual incarnate. The essence of the old addage: "Obscurity is the refuge of incompetence."
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on 26 March 2011
...bringing clarity to how we are manipulated by the whole of the mass media, describing in unique precision how the spectacle (pure capitalism within globalisation) is bulldozing it's way through our lives within the veil of false democracy and who has created the distorted illusion of the reality we live in today.

If you are unaware of the way the political powers in place have manipulated, with skillful psychological prowess, the human collective conscious mind before reading this book, and are receptive to truth and read with an unbiased view point, this book will shock and lift a veil from your eyes you never knew was there. You will never see the world as you did before again after immersing yourself in the fantastic world of Guy Debord.

This book should be raised high at every anti government rally until we are free from the spectacle that controls the collective conscious, but be cautious when you follow this white rabbit and be prepared for an epic journey, you will emerge from this book a different person with a clearer vision and hopefully a mind that has changed for the better.

Contrary to some views here I found it easy to read as it helped expand on thoughts I already had. Along with Freddy and Karl's Communist Manifesto it could be the most dangerous book to challenge popular culture ever put into print.

I absolutely recommend buying this book if its the last thing you do. Once you have read it pass it on or buy it again for your friends and close family.
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on 28 November 2010
there are much better translations, such as the one by Ken Knabb; that can easily be found online for free. this is not an easy or even accurate translation of a book who's key principals are on Wikipedia. Reading it will not enlighten you any more unless you are especially into Situ literature. I recommend reading or watching 'The Angry Brigade' (Carr) and then downloading Knabb's translation for a skip read.
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