Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Cloud Drive Photos Shop now Learn More Learn more Handmade Shop now Learn more Shop Fire Shop Kindle Shop now Pre-order now Shop now

Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars
11
4.6 out of 5 stars
5 star
9
4 star
1
3 star
0
2 star
1
1 star
0
Format: Paperback|Change
Price:£13.99+ Free shipping with Amazon Prime
Your rating(Clear)Rate this item


There was a problem filtering reviews right now. Please try again later.

on 31 May 2013
Gerald Hanley's account of his time serving as a British Officer in Somaliland during WW2 is simply an outstanding book. Beautifully and powerfully written you feel as if you are almost there with Hanley as he battles the heat, dust, disease and isolation, The book provides a wonderfully descriptive and sympathetic account of Somali tribal and cultural life. All up an awesome book.
0Comment| 3 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 8 May 2006
Astonshingly good. Probably the closest you can get to a malaria-induced fever just from reading. The heat, the insanity, the humour, the senseless, the humanity and the inhumanity - they are all there. Bewitchingly atmospheric prose.
0Comment| 12 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 18 January 2013
I live and work amongst Somalis today and it is wonderful to read the experiences of someone who walked such a path before me. It certainly helps me understand where I am and the people I am living with.
0Comment| 4 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 5 October 2008
A marvellously haunting, evocative book. Hanley was a man decades ahead of his time. I have not read a more honest and piercing assessment of colonialism and British imperialism, delivered by a man operating at its very heart and exposed to its contradictions and absurdities on a daily basis. A masterpiece.
0Comment| 11 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 7 October 2012
This is a gripping book from start to finish.

If you are involved in some way with Somalia or Somalis it is a must read. And if you are not it it is still a brilliant read.

In terms of the Somali outlook on life - and their attitude to the rest of the world- nothing much has changed.

Every aspect of life is seen through the prism of Clan identity.

From a reader who has travelled in Somalia and worked with Somalis.
0Comment| 3 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 15 July 2016
Gerald is excellent recounter .I know very well the land the itineraries of his travels from Gardafui ( now Ras Casayr) to Mogadishu .I know also clans who lives in part of these difficult terrains. Very easy to read and each chapter takes you to the following.
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 19 January 2013
Tthis book published in 2004 is the first half of the authors original 1971 book entitled "Warriors and Strangers"with an addendum bringinmg the situation in Somaliland up to date.
THe book deals with the authors experiences in British Somaliland during WW2.While he enjoyed the lonleyness it had severe effects on many British officers.
The author gives an excellent description of waring tribes,their unusual customs and way of life.
A very good read but the book has no table of contents -a basic publication error -and could have done with some pictures.
0Comment| 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 1 August 2016
I'm really disappointed with this book. Being Somali and read many books written by other nationalities about my country, nothing interesting to tell you about this book.
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 5 December 2014
Well written interesting facts about somalis intelligent people where civilisation started and will end. E.g from camel to camel.
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 21 June 2014
I have read this book many times and given it to many of my friends. A wonderful essay on the human condition.
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse