Learn more Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Learn More Shop now Learn more Click Here Shop Kindle Learn More Shop now Shop now

Customer reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars
18
4.6 out of 5 stars


There was a problem filtering reviews right now. Please try again later.

TOP 500 REVIEWERon 25 February 2016
This review is from: The Sun Egg (Mini-Edition) (Hardcover)
A dear little book about a small elf in a wood who likes returning fallen eggs to the mother birds. Then one day she sees a big yellow object and decides the sun has laid an egg and goes off to tell her friends - a cheeky elf, a frog who runs a restaurant (like the sign "Guests are forbidden to eat each other!") and others. And finally they realise what it really is - and the elf gets to have a wonderful adventure.
Memorable pictures - the branches of the fir trees which form a backdrop to many of them are beautifully painted.
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 6 March 2017
Love all of Elsa Berskow books - they are the most 'in demand' in our household.
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 1 March 2009
A small elf discovers a sun egg in the wood, goes on a trip to the warm southern lands to see where the oranges come from, and returns in the spring to her beloved wood. Wonderful!

I already have 4 other Elsa Beskow books, and each one seems just as enchanting as the others. The illustrations and details in the story really capture the imagination of children and adults. I recommend buying the larger version, so you can better enjoy the illustrations.
0Comment| 11 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 26 February 2004
This is a delightful tale of an elf who finds something unusual in her forest. The story follows the elf as she tells all her forest friends what she has found - an object that she believes to be an egg from the Sun. We get to meet her mischievous friend Larch as well as numerous birds and animals as we follow her adventure and eventually discover the true nature of the Sun egg.
My daughter, who is only 26 months old, loves the story and the gentle illustrations are detailed enough to ensure her continued attention as we sit and read the book. She loves asking "What's that?" for each of the animals or birds. There is nothing scary in this book for a young child and I am certain that this book will be a bedtime favourite for a good few years.
0Comment| 21 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 10 September 2013
My son loves the series of books by Elsa Beskow. The story is great and the illustrations are enchanting. A great bedtime read too, because it is not too long.
0Comment| 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 24 February 2014
Bought this for my niece who had it as her preferred bedtime reading for a good month or more, it sits in her bookcase in her favourites section!
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 15 October 2016
Okay. The spitefulness in the story can be missed and changed for the under 7's. Pity the words have this sort of unconsciousness for our times.
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 10 January 2014
grandson's most favourite book for years, lively, interesting and lots of imagination stirred. lovely pictures,a joy to read, would recommend
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 25 January 2015
An enchanting story, with beautiful illustrations. The story is about an orange egg which falls into the wood and is found by a very excited elf who thinks it is the sun’s egg. Just like many of Elsa Beskow's stories, this story lends itself to lots of Forest School/outdoor learning activities. We have used the story to celebrate the Winter Solstice but it could used at anytime of the year. The children can search for their orange egg around the woods and then make special nests from natural materials to keep the sun egg safe. Giant ‘land art’ suns can be made on the floor using natural materials. Make orange bird feeders – cut the orange in half and scrap out the flesh, put two small holes in he side and thread through string and then fill with bird food. Complete the session by serving freshly squeezed orange juice.
0Comment| One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 26 February 2015
I had these as a child (full format) and I LOVE these, more then the kids probably!
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse