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on 9 July 2017
Philippa Gregory's novels never disappoint. It's been awhile since I read one of her books, and so I turned to the next on my list from the Cousins' War collection.
I was spellbound by this intimate drama. I hadn't known much about Henry VII beyond his conquering of Richard III and his fathering of Henry VIII. This portrayal of him as a fearful, tense, and pitiable outsider made for a fascinating read. It is difficult to imagine how his wife, a daughter of the House of York, could find it within herself to disavow all that she had been raised to and champion the Tudor-line. The things that wives and mothers were asked to do; all in the name of backing the right heir to the throne - it is simply unbelievable.
I will return to this series again before long, I am sure. Soon the timelines will connect me back to where I first fell in love with Gregory's work - when I read The Other Boleyn Girl. A future that Henry VIII's parents wouldn't have guessed at; having pledged him, their second son, to the church, believing that Arthur Tudor would be the one to reign.
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on 4 May 2014
This is the latest in a long line of novels based around the end of the Plantagenets and the start of the Tudors. Elizabeth of York marries Henry VII after he defeats her lover (and Uncle) Richard III in battle. This is her story of the turbulent years of his reign, having his children (including Henry VIII) and living in a divided country. The Cousin's War is over (Yorks against Lancasters) but now it's Yorks against Tudors.

Philippa Gregory is my favourite author at the moment. I've read all her books based around this period of history, starting with 'The Other Boleyn Girl' working forwards to 'The Other Queen' (Mary Queen of Scots) and then backwards to 'The Lady of The Rivers' (Jacquetta, grandmother to 'The White Princess'). I'm utterly obsessed with Tudor times so I was bound to enjoy this book which links up with 'The Constant Princess' (Catherine of Aragon).

Gregory has a way with words, her books are effortless to read, the characters are gripping and the action is always dramatic and fascinating. I love the other side of history which she gives, in 'The Kingmakers Daughter' we see the softer side of Richard III, how he was devoted to his brother Edward IV and torn apart with his other brother, George's deceptions. The best part of this novel is how it answers and yet doesn't answer the mystery of the Princes in the tower, who killed them, were they actually Edward IV's sons or imposters?

These novels are based on huge amount of research and a pinch of artistic license, history told from the women's point of view is always going to be slightly different (and more interesting) to what we've been taught in schools. Gregory manages to bring history alive and I can actually picture myself there, in the thick of it and loving every minute. I highly recommend all the books mentioned above, they are all superbly rich and evocative, you won't even realise you're learning things until it's too late.

Rating: 5/5
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on 7 September 2013
I liked this book for what it is - a great read. Although based on fact, Miss. Gregory always gives her own slant on what could have happened, but it still doesn't answer the question - Why did Elizabeth become so 'grey' from being a vibrant princess to Tudor's consort with little to say. Was she going to marry Richard? I don't think I could believe that, he would never have done such a thing to his brother's memory and I don't believe he would have hurt Anne Neville the way this book insinuates. Did she know the whereabouts of her brothers? I think perhaps she did, one or both of them. Perhaps that is why her mother secluded herself in a convent, to be able to plot without have the Tudor's spies looking over her shoulder all the time. I suppose these are questions we will
know, but now we have Richard's DNA, surely this would be a good time to DNA test the bones in the urn, supposedly the remains of the Princes.
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on 16 August 2017
Mrs C is always a fan of period writing and drama and to be fair, Ms Gregory was most definitely the Queen of Tudor writing so this wasn't a difficult one for her. Enjoyed all the Tudor books by her. If you want more fact than drama then I suggest Tracey Boreman. Brilliantly written books that have more fact based evidence but still stacks of intrigue and excitement.
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on 28 August 2017
I love all these historical novels. Whilst I realise they are fact with a bit of padding out and authors opinions, I find these a great way to learn history. I've learnt more from these than when at school.
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on 2 September 2017
An amazing set of books. Great as a stand alone book but try and read them in order. Love the historical element and I have enjoyed looking up the royal family tree.
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on 21 July 2017
This book is fiction but it's a compelling read and a fantasticstic insight into history thank Miss Gregory I really enjoyed it
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on 27 August 2017
Wonderful read as per all PGs books,never able to put them down once I open the first chapter. Very enjoyable.
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on 19 September 2017
I picked this book as it looked interesting and it was. It made me sad to think of the two young Yorks being killed - normally Richard III was always blamed, so a very interesting story.
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on 29 December 2014
You will not be able to put this book down. It is thrilling, gripping, shocking and beyond belief but probably not far from the truth. History could so easily have been different.
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