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on 22 September 2007
Deleuze is perhaps the most authoritative of Foucault's commentators. Not because of their friendship, collaborations, or dialogues. Not even because of the enormous respect each held for the other. If this book were written by a stranger, it would still be a part of the Foucault canon. Because it grasps hold of the Foucault project and grapples with it, refusing to let go and refusing to let it slink away.
The book is divided into two, where the first part includes articles previously published on certain works (The Archeology of Knowledge, and Discipline and Punish), and the second struggles to elucidate and elaborate the project of "Thinking Otherwise". This part embraces both Foucault's early thoughts on transgression and his later accounts on techniques of the self. It draws on his histories and his theories of power: Foucault's method and his objectives. It also reflects Deleuze's own concerns with thought and the fold.
In terms of texts, this book is important because it expands on the thoughts only sketchily worked out in his article in "Magazine Litteraire" (published 1994: written in 1977, and translated in Davidson's Foucault and his Interlocutors, UofChicago Press, 1997). It is also tantalising in its hints towards and references to Foucault's unpublished work in volume 4 of the History of Sexuality.
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on 6 February 2015
Deleuze is a difficult writer. While I find him incomprehensible in some texts, there are others, such as "Postscript on the Societies of Control", where he is less obscure. I think this text straddles the line, although leans more towards the 'less obscure' side of things.

On its face, this is a simple exposition of Foucault's work. However, Deleuze, who was good friends with Foucault, offers an interesting, unique analysis and defence of Foucault's ouevre. Although the text is hard going in places, it's full of rich insights and includes a number of quotable quotes (such as my favourite, "government comes before state"). I would therefore recommend it to any students grappling with the main concepts or areas Foucault wrote about: archaeology, genealogy or power.
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on 7 February 2014
Quite repetitive. Describes Foucault's Archaeology of Knowledge. The Power/Knowledge relation is desire and the differentiation of the differentiator, the precursor referred to in Difference and Repetition.
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on 30 December 2012
this short book is incredibly rich and challenging, a syntheses of the thought of 2 of the greatest thinkers ever, was in good condition and came promptly
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on 4 January 2001
Maybe inaccesible but nevertheless the first and still the best book on Michel Foucault as philosopher. Contrary to the american books about Foucault this one tries to understand the more obscure parts of Foucault philosophy.
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on 31 December 2013
Who could resist the student and the master in dialogue? A must-have read if either Foucault or Deleuze are of interest
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