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Sam (Samantha) is a young lady whose father is a fisherman on a small island. Her mother is dead, and she is close to her cat, Bangs, who mentally serves as her surrogate parrent when her father is gone on his boat. Being a little lonely, she has an active fantasy life. Those imaginings creep out into her conversations. "Not even the sailors home from the sea could tell stranger stories than Sam."
Her father is concerned about this, and asks her to talk "REAL, not MOONSHINE. MOONSHINE spells trouble." "Sam promised."
The only problem was that she would slip a bit. Thomas believed everything she said. What could happen as a result?
This book won the 1967 Caldecott award for the best illustrated children's story. You will find that the black and brown outlines and washes contrast with white to create stark and emotionally laden images. The heaviness of losing her mother weighs on the reader as well as on Sam. When problems loom, the coloring becomes darker and stronger. You will feel like powerful music is playing in the background. There is an operatic quality here with story, lines in the illustrations, and illustration coloring echoing one another to heighten the effects.
The story itself is the best one I have seen for examining the issues around fantasies imagined by children. Nice distinctions are made between internally experienced and externally verbalized fantasies, and also between dangerous and nondangerous ways of verbalizing.
We all love a good story, so you don't want to banish your child's imagination totally. This book should help you to channel that imagination more constructively. The example in the book is so extreme that most children will see the lesson easily, without feeling that the story is aimed directly at them.
Unlike most children's books, this one has a lot of drama and emotion to it. Although simply written and illustrated, it contains the elements of a grander story of the sort that adults would love if garbed as a full-scale novel. I kept thinking about how Stephen King would have done a treatment of the same story for adults.
After you read this modern version of Aesop's Fables, consider how else you can use fictional stories to convey important lessons to those you love and care about.
Communicate with the best interests of the listener or reader in mind!
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Sam (Samantha) is a young lady whose father is a fisherman on a small island. Her mother is dead, and she is close to her cat, Bangs, who mentally serves as her surrogate parrent when her father is gone on his boat. Being a little lonely, she has an active fantasy life. Those imaginings creep out into her conversations. "Not even the sailors home from the sea could tell stranger stories than Sam."
Her father is concerned about this, and asks her to talk "REAL, not MOONSHINE. MOONSHINE spells trouble." "Sam promised."
The only problem was that she would slip a bit. Thomas believed everything she said. What could happen as a result?
This book won the 1967 Caldecott award for the best illustrated children's story. You will find that the black and brown outlines and washes contrast with white to create stark and emotionally laden images. The heaviness of losing her mother weighs on the reader as well as on Sam. When problems loom, the coloring becomes darker and stronger. You will feel like powerful music is playing in the background. There is an operatic quality here with story, lines in the illustrations, and illustration coloring echoing one another to heighten the effects.
The story itself is the best one I have seen for examining the issues around fantasies imagined by children. Nice distinctions are made between internally experienced and externally verbalized fantasies, and also between dangerous and nondangerous ways of verbalizing.
We all love a good story, so you don't want to banish your child's imagination totally. This book should help you to channel that imagination more constructively. The example in the book is so extreme that most children will see the lesson easily, without feeling that the story is aimed directly at them.
Unlike most children's books, this one has a lot of drama and emotion to it. Although simply written and illustrated, it contains the elements of a grander story of the sort that adults would love if garbed as a full-scale novel. I kept thinking about how Stephen King would have done a treatment of the same story for adults.
After you read this modern version of Aesop's Fables, consider how else you can use fictional stories to convey important lessons to those you love and care about.
Communicate with the best interests of the listener or reader in mind!
0Comment| One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 6 February 2015
Great item, as descirbed, quick delivery. Recommended seller!
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on 15 May 1999
A small book for children about a little girl ("Sam") who keeps telling wild tales ("moonshine") that eventually cause troubles. She has to be able to distinguish her wild tales from reality. This book can lead to interesting and worthwhile discussions between a parent and and their child. The book won the 1967 Caldecott Medal for best illustrations in a book for children.
0Comment| 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse



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