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VINE VOICEon 12 October 2017
In an otherwise beautifully produced book the iconic photo of Scott and his doomed companions at the South Pole ( between pages 96 and 97) has been completely mis-captioned. The colourised photo actually shows Bowers (pulling the camera string) and Wilson (seated left to right) and Oates, Scott and P.O.Evans (standing left to right). In the book the only person correctly identified is Scott!
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on 1 March 2014
If you think you know what cold is, read this book! It's not only a great account of the exploration of a then largely unknown continent, it's interesting to read about the science conducted at the time. Scott has been much criticised in recent times; even being called inept. His diary debunks this myth. The expedition was primarily a scientific one, with the AMBITION of reaching the pole. I do think you should read 'The Voyage of the Discovery' first though.
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on 15 September 2017
Excellent fascinating a real insight into the mindset of the the period. This is a must read for anyone interested in Scott.
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on 21 October 2017
Book, just what I ordered, but NO SLIPCASE. Annoyed about this. Clearly shows slipcase in photograph. Ho hum.
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on 3 May 2017
Gripping tale, quite harrowing, but an interesting read.
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on 13 January 2011
This is a fascinating book, telling the story of Scott's expedition to the South Pole, 1910-1912. The book comprises extracts from Scott's journals and therefore sets out the narrative as it happened, as each event was encountered. The book provides an annotated map inside front and back covers that plots each day's journey and lists all the men on the expedition with their rank and nickname where applicable. This detail draws the reader further into the narrative and Scott's writing is concise, factual and never boring. His descriptions of life on Antartica and how well it was borne by his party exactly one hundred years ago are of great interest for us who are used to travel being so easy in the modern world, and it is hard to think of the planning and provisioning that had to be made for such a journey at the turn of the last century. The fact that nature has not changed with time can be seen in the book and Scott's description and surprise at the intelligence of the killer whales they encountered on the ice floe could be a voiceover for a natural history programme. The struggle of the daily marches is equally well described and the reader is carried along on that journey, willing the men to succeed. We share the disappointment of those who were retired from the party that eventually reached the Pole on January 18th 1912 and we share in the disappointment of their discovery that they had been beaten by the Norwegian party of Amundsen by a whole month. Most of all though, we feel the pain and final disappointment as it becomes clear in Scott's journal that the party of five is not going to make it back due to the horrendous weather, low food and fuel supplies and the unwillingness to abandon any members of the party. The loss of Petty Officer Evans shows how quickly a strong man can be brought down by the conditions while Lieutenant Oates' demise is heroically tragic. The last words of Scott himself show the shock and resignation that death was the reward for the ambition of the party and the short chapter detailing how the bodies of the last three men were found brings a fitting closure. Scott's message to the public is reproduced at the end of the book and this, together with the helpful Glossary and photographs scattered throughout, provides a good end to a tremendous story. Scott may not have lived, but he certainly told a tale of `the hardihood, endurance, and courage' of his companions that would stir anyone's heart.
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on 19 December 2013
I first read this book on a lonely holiday in Wales. It was a companion. As the details of the tragedy enfolded I could not put it down, and felt lucky to be alive, warm and not hungry. His diary is a hero's masterpiece of living your life as best you can, and of writing your experiences to communicate with the world. As it turned out, for the last time.
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on 21 May 2015
A fantastic and interesting read if you are interested in Scotts Expedition.
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on 5 June 2015
Great, it came quicker than I expected and I am already hooked.
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on 22 July 2016
An interesting view of a bygone age but a fair one
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