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4.1 out of 5 stars
42
4.1 out of 5 stars
Infinity
Format: Hardcover|Change


HALL OF FAMETOP 50 REVIEWERon 2 October 2014
The story running through Marvel Comics’ ‘Infinity’, Avengers and New Avengers is collected here. It is a superb cosmic epic (with a couple of reservations noted below) featuring the Avengers, the Illuminati, and most of the major spacefaring races. It also manages to tie in a number of Earthly stories to the plot, and there is even room for a few ‘character’ pieces among the epic events, helped, no doubt, by the fact that Jonathan Hickman is writing the entire volume, and though there are a number of artists at work, the art also seems to be fairly consistent throughout.

The story is reasonably straightforward – the Builders, the race that claims to be responsible for spreading life throughout the universe with the aid of their Gardeners and the like, some of whom we have met in recent issues – have sent an invasion fleet which is crossing the galaxy, destroying all life in its path, and it is heading for Earth. Fortunately for the plot, it is crossing the borders of Skrull, Kree, Shi’ar and Spartoi space, and a vast coalition of forces is gathered to stop it. The Avengers, having become aware of the invasion, sent their combined forces out to join in. Meanwhile, Thanos takes advantage of their absence to invade Earth, ostensibly looking for the Infinity Gems, but really looking for his last surviving son, and Black Bolt knows his whereabouts. We see Black Bolt destroying Attilan (with Thanos aboard) releasing the Terragen Mists over the entire Earth, triggering Inhuman abilities in people carrying certain genes (which includes Thanos's son); while in space Captain America and the Avengers struggle to stop the Builder fleet, after the Galactic Coalition has failed; while the Illuminati face another colliding parallel-world Earth, and discover what is really happening to the multiverse, and why ALL the Earths must be destroyed...

This really is an excellent storyline – or two or three, in fact, as good as anything the Avengers have provided in the ‘Marvel Now!’ period, and at the end, despite clear resolutions to the major threats, an even greater crisis facing the entire multiverse is revealed, and several future plot-lines or possibilities are set in motion.

THE SPOILER ZONE
For a detailed breakdown of the individual issues collected here, see Infinity Volume 1 and Infinity Volume 2.
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on 25 August 2015
A stunningly beautiful graphic novel. As a fan of Marvel Comics growing up in the 80s and 90s, Secret Wars and the Infinity Gauntlet were some of my most cherished comic book memories. After reconnecting with these as an adult, I wanted to see how these characters and ideas had developed in the new millennium. The difference could not be more stark. The artwork is polished, textured and impressive, and the tone is much more mature, with weightier subject matter. There are little to no quips and one-liners, but the underlying theme of a universe slowly dying lends this story real gravitas.

Despite Thanos' menacing visage on the cover, he actually plays somewhat of a supporting role here, and I found that what his actions cause others to do is much more interesting than what he is actually up to.

There is also a lot to catch up with if you're coming to this as a novice. The book can certainly stand alone as a self-contained story but it really helps to know about the Civil War, Illuminati and The Siege storylines. Indeed, for me this acted as a gateway drug, and I've been voraciously reading up on these storylines and more. I actually came back to this and read it a second time after catching up a bit and it has only improved my experience, so this rewards repeated reads. Now I'm looking forward to the new Secret Wars...somebody stop me!
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on 15 January 2016
What a graphic novel. Cant stop reading
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on 27 February 2017
The first 30-40 pages of the one I received were badly bounded and I could not read/see part of the tables

If you like large (and this is VERY large) choral events, this is for you as it spans all of the different Marvel arches- only Cap gets a special focus towards the end
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on 12 September 2015
Brilliant condition thanks
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HALL OF FAMETOP 10 REVIEWERon 2 October 2014
The story running through Marvel Comics’ ‘Infinity’, Avengers and New Avengers is collected here. It is a superb cosmic epic (with a couple of reservations noted below) featuring the Avengers, the Illuminati, and most of the major spacefaring races. It also manages to tie in a number of Earthly stories to the plot, and there is even room for a few ‘character’ pieces among the epic events, helped, no doubt, by the fact that Jonathan Hickman is writing the entire volume, and though there are a number of artists at work, the art also seems to be fairly consistent throughout.

The story is reasonably straightforward – the Builders, the race that claims to be responsible for spreading life throughout the universe with the aid of their Gardeners and the like, some of whom we have met in recent issues – have sent an invasion fleet which is crossing the galaxy, destroying all life in its path, and it is heading for Earth. Fortunately for the plot, it is crossing the borders of Skrull, Kree, Shi’ar and Spartoi space, and a vast coalition of forces is gathered to stop it. The Avengers, having become aware of the invasion, sent their combined forces out to join in. Meanwhile, Thanos takes advantage of their absence to invade Earth, ostensibly looking for the Infinity Gems, but really looking for his last surviving son, and Black Bolt knows his whereabouts. We see Black Bolt destroying Attilan (with Thanos aboard) releasing the Terragen Mists over the entire Earth, triggering Inhuman abilities in people carrying certain genes (which includes Thanos's son); while in space Captain America and the Avengers struggle to stop the Builder fleet, after the Galactic Coalition has failed; while the Illuminati face another colliding parallel-world Earth, and discover what is really happening to the multiverse, and why ALL the Earths must be destroyed...

This really is an excellent storyline – or two or three, in fact, as good as anything the Avengers have provided in the ‘Marvel Now!’ period, and at the end, despite clear resolutions to the major threats, an even greater crisis facing the entire multiverse is revealed, and several future plot-lines or possibilities are set in motion.

THE SPOILER ZONE
For a detailed breakdown of the individual issues collected here, see Infinity Volume 1 and Infinity Volume 2.
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on 23 April 2015
Wow!
That has been my initial reaction to this comic book collective.
Not having read this era of Marvel comics before, and more so because of the upcoming "Avengers: Infinity War parts 1 & 2" movies, I thought I would do a little bit of research.
I read the original "Infinity Gauntlet" crossover when I was younger and I will admit that this is much more complex than that storyline ever was.
Featuring what has to be almost every Marvel character, and quite a few new additions to the Avengers team, this is quite a well spun, well crafted story.
What helps prevent things from getting too complex is that the action is seperated by chapter pages allowing the action/drama to jump from one group of heroes to the other, and there are many groups of heroes.
the artwork is fantastic and suits the storyline well.
Lastly I guess I should mention that I went into this thinking that it would be a carbon copy of the original "Infinity Gauntlet" and was very pleasantly surprised that it is not.
If you missed this before I would highly recommend that you pick it up and give it a go. It sounds a bit pricey but this book is a good inch and a half of quality comic book storytelling!
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on 13 March 2015
How wonderful to re-live this great story arch!
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on 30 January 2015
The story itself was great, the artwork was solid and consistent throughout also.
Sets things up nicely for Secret Wars.
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on 26 September 2014
This OSHC (not an Omnibus) collects Infinity 1-6, New Avengers 7-12, Avengers 12-23 & Infinity Infinite Comic 1-2 and features pages of variant and composite cover art.

There are many ways to evaluate and review a book. Perhaps the most telling is how quickly you read through it. At over 600 pages this is a big book, but I read it in just three sittings which for me is the ultimate compliment.

After more than a decade of Brian Bendis dominating Marvel, this book feels so utterly diffent. Hickman has already proved his credentials on his substantial, highly original FF run and is clearly the right man to take the Avengers galactic.

Although this follows Bendis’ Thanos vs Avengers cash-in, ahem arc, there is no mention of it here. This is old school Thanos, leading a band of accolytes in the way that Jim Starlin used to write him, before he became a self-pholosophising, introspective nihilist. And given the title' Infinity' you might be expecting some remix of Starlin’s Infinity Gauntlet, which this isn’t. In fact it’s far more of a space opera (in the style of D’nA) than a cosmic odyssey (in the style of Starlin or Marz). There are many genre reference points throughout and the inevitable nods to iconic imagery - Hickman is clearly having some fun but the narrative is played straight.

I won’t spoil the plot, but you’ll probably want to catch at least a couple the preceding Avengers instalments to be up to speed with this big story. It ties in well with recent marvel events across the MU (and sets the scene for follow-ups) and is written in a mature and straightforward style. Dialogue is in character, without a ‘whoof’ or a ‘boom’ anywhere!

Hickman goes for realism throughout, with Hulk pretty much just the very strong human in a spacesuit, while it’s rightly left to the heavy-hitters Thor, Hyperion, Smasher and Captain Universe to engage with the serious stuff. Refreshingly, Hickman clearly views Thor as Marvel's powerhouse as he always was, but bucks the 'nu marvel' trend. Most of the art is great, some small bits not so. Yu has come on since his highly confused layouts but still has a way to go. Artistically, closing Surfer instalment is a treat to behold.

Since Marvel updated the OSHC format the pages have got thinner and the covers (underneath the jacket) feature a mono art detail of the interior art. This book has Galdiator and Cap grimly observing a space battle as it unfolds - a perfect summary image of this story. After the run of faintly preposterous, dissapointing ‘events’ Siege, Fear Itself, AoU etc. (most of which smacked of lazy, money-generating cynicism) this feels like a genuine landmark event in the Marvel continuum and sets the scene for many ongoing concepts. Long may Hickman continue.
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