Learn more Download now Shop now Learn more Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Learn More Shop now Shop now Learn more Shop Fire Shop Kindle New Album - Tom Chaplin Learn more Shop Women's Shop Men's



on 16 October 2017
A Marvel "what's going on?" classic and a good read that puts the Scarlet Witch at the forefront of the story. If you generally enjoy Marvel fare you should like this.
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 26 April 2017
its ok
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 16 July 2017
Can't wait to read the next instalment not giving anything away but can't beat a good cliffhanger to bait u back.
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 28 March 2010
'House of M' takes off from the 'Avengers: Disassembled' series, so I'd recommend giving that a read beforehand or at least glancing over a summary. If you're looking for a lot of action then you might be slightly disappointed with this, as whilst it does have its fair share of fighting, it primarily focuses on how much the world has been messed up and how our heroes deal with that and are emotionally affected by it.

It's more suited towards the more experienced comic fan, as there are quite a few less-than-famous Marvel characters involved who I wasn't familiar with. The collection is drawn by the brilliant Olivier Coipel and as a result the art is fantastic. I'd certainly recommend this to anyone in the mood for a well-drawn, well-written major event set in the Marvel universe.
0Comment| One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
TOP 1000 REVIEWERon 10 April 2009
As a mature fan of the Marvel Universe with a strong grounding in Silver Age, Bronze age, late eighties/early nineties and recent story arcs, I found this limited series disappointing to say the least. This was frustrating, as in the right hands, this would have been a fantastic piece of work, especially considering how important it is in re-setting the absurd number of mutants in the Marvel universe back to a reasonable number.

The biggest problem is the art. Coipel displays the influence of Moebius (well, he would, as he's French) and that's no bad thing, as this is detectable even in the art of the superb yet quirky Frank Quitely. While this means that the draughtsmanship depicting buildings etc is attractive, Coipel's figure style is apalling - he has a tendency to foreshorten and bulk up characters who are traditionally (and correctly in my view) lithe rather than blocky, consequently making them appear like sweaty wrestlers as opposed to the apollonian titans we're used to. His Captain America is absurdly squat and pumped, while (in the same splash panel), the much more powerful She-Hulk is positively slender. Even worse, his rendering of faces is just dreadful - characters with clearly defined facial identities are unrecognisable and crudely depicted. Is this just style, or just bad drawing> Take a look at (for example) Buscema's Avengers, then look at Coipels - yeah, his 'style' is just plain bad. How did such a terrible, inconsistent penciller get selected for such an important storyline? Making characters instantly recognisable out of costume is the first golden rule of good superhero pencilling and Coipel struggles to make a character look like the same person from one panel to the next.

On to Bendis, who is usually a competent writer at the very least, and sometimes excellent (I'll stop short of claiming he's brilliant, as he hasn't quite made it in that respect in my opinion, especially when compared to Brubaker, whose current run on Captain America is state-of-the-art mainstream superhero comic). Here, he seems to be writing to editorial order, and aside from the few big moments of revelation (which are Ok in themselves, but not very subtly done), he seems to be lacking lightness of touch and the humanity he usually pours into work like New Avengers. The reactions of Spider-Man to the plot scenario are interesting, but under-examined (and Bendis writes Spidey well normally), while Wolverine and his fellow X-Men are on hand to spout the cliches they are always over-reliant upon.

Having criticised Bendis, I'll add that I would have enjoyed this a lot more if Coipel hand't been involved. If you like strong, consistent penciling and an artist who understands anatomy, then avoid him. If you like a stylist who is consistent, go with Quitely, whose strangeness is offset by his originality and consistency.

To sum up for contemporary readers, this is not a patch on Mark Millar's 'Civil War' or the first two hardcover volumes of 'New Avengers', and ranks somewhere lower than 'Avengers Disassembled', another story that should have felt much more important than it did - the hand of editorial control being exercised too tightly again?

It's a shame that the First Family of Mutantkind - noble, arogant, fascinating - continue to be depicted so poorly by bad artists and writing that treats them with so little respect. Magneto, Quicksilver and the Scarlet Witch have been overexposed for years and their mystique is almost lost. Shame - they were long my favourite Marvel characters and it saddens me to see them handled so uninpsiringly here.
11 Comment| 3 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 31 July 2012
The Scarlet Witch has gone crazy after killing some of her fellow Avengers leaving the hero team along with the X-Men pondering what to do with her - do they kill her for what's she done or because her powers have become unstable? Before they have a chance to decide anything she uses everything she has to change the world into a mutant utopia where humans are hounded and giving each mutant their heart's desire.

Brian Michael Bendis writes a fascinating event book the equivalent of DC's "Elseworlds" series where we step through the looking-glass into an alternate world representing the ultimate what if...? What if Peter Parker and Gwen Stacy were married? What if Scott Summers and Emma Frost were together? What if Xavier were dead and there were no X-Men - what would take their place? What if Magneto - head of the House of M - were ruler of the world?

While I thought the book was a great read there were a few things that bothered me. Scarlet Witch is just too powerful. She can change the world in the blink of an eye? It's too much, not even Phoenix was that powerful. She goes from a mutant to Titan status in this one book before going back to mutant at the end. It's a bit contrived.

Also the premise of giving everyone "what they most desire" is a bit selective: was it Rogue and Nightcrawler's wish to become underlings to Wolverine? How about all Luke Cage's followers - did they desire most to be Cage's lackeys? I imagine each mutant would most desire to have the same status as, say, Spiderman or Wolverine - that is to say, be in the spotlight, the centre of attention. I thought it was unfortunate that Bendis left out Thor and Hulk who would've been interesting choices for this kind of storyline, though I did think his choice for Cap was very revealing in a touching and clever way.

The panel layouts are annoying too. Some panels stretch across two pages and then the panels beneath it stack up so it's unclear whether they're to be read up-down or across left/right. It's either Bendis or the artist Oliver Coipel's fault but it was overly complicated when it didn't need to be. Very poorly thought out.

But these are minor gripes, I enjoyed the book and felt Bendis did a fine job of telling a great alterna-take on the Marvel Universe. Original and well written, "House of M" is for superhero comics fans looking for a different take on a raft of classic characters.
0Comment| 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 23 February 2013
Whoa! I picked this up because I thought, as a massive X-Men fan, I had to read this but all I have to say is really don't just think of this as "The one the mutants lost their powers" because while that is important the story has so much more to offer and is more a powerful family drama than game-changing event. Truly, the emotion is increadible throughout with many of the heroes being emotionally sledgehammered as they try to cope with the consequences of Wanda's actions. My heart especially went out to poor Spiderman. Also, there is an interesting examination of what would happen if the human-mutant political power balance was reversed. I don't want to give too much away to destroy the surprise of the experience but really this is not only an essential read for mutant fans but also a supreme comic book experience.
0Comment| One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 30 March 2014
I wanted a comic which was a perfect merger of the X-Men and the Avengers, arguably two of Marvel's most popular teams. House of M was the best option given the circumstance. Since I am only reading everything Avengers right now, this was a unique opportunity to learn more about the X-Men as well. I loved how Wolverine, who has been my favorite character since my childhood, was the protagonist and how he deals with the task at hand. It also had loads of scenes with Magneto and his family i.e Scarlet Witch, Quicksilver and even Polaris. A parallel universe and a staple of Marvel's best characters made this a must read!
0Comment| One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 30 August 2006
This is a wicked comic.

It's pretty Twilight Zone in execution. Basically Wanda Maximoff alters reality and the X-Men and Avengers have to sort out the resulting mess.

The book opens strongly and continues in this fashion. Much care has been taken to ensure that reader understands that there is a lot at stake here.

My only gripes are that there are a lot of characters (having not been reading comics for as long as I'm gussing Marvel's target audience have) who I don't know or would like to have seen more of - such as She-Hulk. Also the panel layout is very epic. Single panels often strech across both pages and it is often unclear as to what I should be reading next. This happened a lot to me through out the reading. I was reading down when I should have been reading across.

That said there is some really lavish artwork, such as Wolverine's daring motorbike jump across a junction and the first formal introduction of the House of M itself.

A really cool comic. I'd be very sad if the Hulk and Spiderman books just show the characters in their alternate reality because I feel this story's strong enough to continue for a while on it's own.

I've ordered the Excalibur prelude from Amazon but it's taking it's time. I'd like to read that before I buy any of the later books. But I think I will get the next few since the first was so good.

This is definatly worth a read if you like this kind of thing.
11 Comment| 15 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 31 July 2012
The Scarlet Witch has gone crazy after killing some of her fellow Avengers leaving the hero team along with the X-Men pondering what to do with her - do they kill her for what's she done or because her powers have become unstable? Before they have a chance to decide anything she uses everything she has to change the world into a mutant utopia where humans are hounded and giving each mutant their heart's desire.

Brian Michael Bendis writes a fascinating event book the equivalent of DC's "Elseworlds" series where we step through the looking-glass into an alternate world representing the ultimate what if...? What if Peter Parker and Gwen Stacy were married? What if Scott Summers and Emma Frost were together? What if Xavier were dead and there were no X-Men - what would take their place? What if Magneto - head of the House of M - were ruler of the world?

While I thought the book was a great read there were a few things that bothered me. Scarlet Witch is just too powerful. She can change the world in the blink of an eye? It's too much, not even Phoenix was that powerful. She goes from a mutant to Titan status in this one book before going back to mutant at the end. It's a bit contrived.

Also the premise of giving everyone "what they most desire" is a bit selective: was it Rogue and Nightcrawler's wish to become underlings to Wolverine? How about all Luke Cage's followers - did they desire most to be Cage's lackeys? I imagine each mutant would most desire to have the same status as, say, Spiderman or Wolverine - that is to say, be in the spotlight, the centre of attention. I thought it was unfortunate that Bendis left out Thor and Hulk who would've been interesting choices for this kind of storyline, though I did think his choice for Cap was very revealing in a touching and clever way.

The panel layouts are annoying too. Some panels stretch across two pages and then the panels beneath it stack up so it's unclear whether they're to be read up-down or across left/right. It's either Bendis or the artist Oliver Coipel's fault but it was overly complicated when it didn't need to be. Very poorly thought out.

But these are minor gripes, I enjoyed the book and felt Bendis did a fine job of telling a great alterna-take on the Marvel Universe. Original and well written, "House of M" is for superhero comics fans looking for a different take on a raft of classic characters.
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse

Customers also viewed these items

Secret Invasion
£14.99
Siege
£9.78

Need customer service? Click here