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on 21 June 2017
I have been reading the books in this series and really lie the way that the characters Nina and Eddie are so natural, especially Eddie's asides and comments about films. The language is also appropriate for the action. Sometimes the type of adventure can appear to be unlikely, but holds together as a thriller drama.
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on 6 August 2017
Really exciting story but how stupid some officials are over status and money. Could read again in a year or so.
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on 17 October 2017
EASY TO READ, HARD TO PUT DOWN, AS THE STORY FLOWS SO WELL.
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on 23 November 2017
Another fab book
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on 6 August 2017
An excellent read, good quality purchase.
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on 7 August 2017
My husband enjoys this series of books
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on 16 August 2017
Another brilliant Wilde and Chase adventure
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on 30 June 2015
There are some readers who do not like blockbuster style action in books, preferring the mayhem to be limited to two sentences - ok, I'm exaggerating - and that books should be like books, and action only should be on screen etc. But I feel having action in books is a great alternative to watching it on screen, as reading, as we all know, is good for your mind etc, and books like the Cult of Osiris can get people who don't normally read to become readers, especially if they're big cinema goers of the blockbuster kind, which this book is. A blockbuster with plenty of car chases, fights, gags and escapism. Actually, reading an Andy Mcdermott book is an equivalent to watching a blockbuster. No different. I think Cult of Osiris is a fun- packed, well paced riot from the get go, and I particularly love Macy Sharif ( she's quite hot) and the Hollywood star Chase is body guarding is funny. The interactions between the two leads are great, though it definitely puts me off marriage. It's not deep literature about flower gardening and victorian sewers, but boy, is it fun, and it sure chirps me up. Definitely one of mr Mcdermott's best.

Rex Grainger - the author of Elixir Stone
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on 5 November 2009
Book 5 of the Nina Wilde / Eddie Chase series was released early in many parts of the country and I was delighted to find it at W H Smith in Penzance.

If you know Andy McDermotts' books then you'll be pleased to know that this is more of the same. If you don't know Andys' books then think James Bond meets John McClane meets Lara Croft meets Michael Bay meets relentless action sequences and you're half way there.

The action in this book floats between Egypt, New York, Paris and Switzerland and, again, the pace is frenetic. Car chases, gun fights, punch ups, religious cults, booby traps and lost secrets all crop up to give you a joyous escape from the 9-5.

The baddies are suitably nasty, the plot interesting and the action will have you turning the pages like there's no tomorrow.

*****************Potential spoiler alert******************

However, during my reading of this book I was constantly thinking that Nina and Eddie are always "safe" and maybe that weakens some of the tension? Authors such as Vince Flynn, Matthew Reilly and James Twining have killed off recurring characters in their respective series of books and this has not diminished their sales / stories. Maybe it's time for Andy to do the same to keep things fresh?

I'm aware that these books are about Nina and Eddie but to add to character development how would one cope without the other? Just a thought.

Bottom line: Andy once again creates an exciting, interesting and enjoyable read. Popcorn entertainment at its best and I look forward to the next one.
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on 12 June 2011
I must admit that I am developing something of a love for thrillers with any sort of connection to history - and this one is no exception. Of course literary snobs won't like it and neither will "academic" historians. If you are looking for an intellectual thriller with historical connections, try Foucault's Pendulum by Umberto Eco. But if you are not looking for academic distractions and are willing fasten your seat belt and go along for the ride you will be taken on a roller-coaster of an adventure by this book.

McDermott clearly had a movie in mind when he wrote this. The action sequences positively cry out for the Hollywood treatment - or should I say heli-wood? The hero is an ex-SAS man who knows how to handle tough situations and one can almost imagine Tinseltown A-listers lining up for the part. His other half is an archaeologist - like the heroine in Adam Palmer's The Moses Legacy (another adventure involving ancient Egypt and modern conspiracies). But in this case her career is on the rocks and she looking for a resume-builder.

This book has more visual action than Palmer's well-balanced offering and far more than Dan Brown's ponderous The Lost Symbol. But it lacks the intelligence (real or pseudo) that gives those books an added element of appeal. In that sense this is very much a "boy's" book rather than one that can cut across the gender divide. Having said that, as one of the boys, I did enjoy it.
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