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4.3 out of 5 stars
27
4.3 out of 5 stars
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on 28 October 2011
I delayed getting this book because of the negative reviews, until my friend recommended it. I really regretted not having read it sooner! If you are interested in questions like "when do children develop a concept of self and other / categorisation / human faces" etc. then this book is ideal. In other words, perfect for any new parent with an interest in psychology, philosophy, neuroscience* or artificial intelligence. Yes, it could have been more concise - but that is true of a lot of popular science, and at times I enjoyed the style of the prose (especially the closing chapter).

*If you are specifically interested in neuroscience then "The Science of Parenting" by Margot Sunderland is a better choice.
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on 30 September 2004
I read this a book as a new parent and found it wonderfully infomrative and entertaining. I judged it as a university lecturer, health professional and someone who studied developmental psychology in depth as an undergraduate.The book is excellent - it is a model of good communication. Accesibility is sometimes quite compatible with academic rigour even though many in the business act as if it is not. If it's not your thing fine but don't knock it!
It is not designed as a sole textbook. It pulls together a broad range of higly complex research in a way that is understandable and gives the bigger picture of a whole child at the centre. It gives a good account of the conclusions of up to date research but it doesn't give detail of it nor is it the best source to use to get straight to the primary research. Its a small price to pay for making the book so readable. I would hope that students have access to other texts and references to primary sources in any case.
The role it can serve and does serve well is to give a broad picture to any novice to the 'academic' discipline. New students need that more than new parents. New parents will I think enjoy the ride and might benefit from the ocassional reminder that all that dribbling gurgling and chaos emanates from a sophiticated being who is solving problems now and will be teaching you new things in a year or two....
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on 23 June 2007
Help you understand how babies and young children think.

There are some surprising findings about how much even newborns know.

I thoroughly recommend it to anyone who has young children in their life (and I'm only an uncle). (I've given copies of it to a few new parents I know).
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on 24 July 2016
I only bought this book after reading the other Amazon reviews and I would agree with everyone else that I would highly recommend this book. It's not an easy read but an extremely interesting read. As already said I also wish I had read it before having my baby. It talks about a babies brain and how it develops and I have found it makes me enjoy interacting with my little one more. When he throws food on the floor or try's and pulls at an electric wire I just think about the authors explaining that they are almost like little mini scientists trying to work out how the world works. This is not a how to look after your baby book but they are lots of those all ready. It's more a philosophical and scientific book on the early stages of a babies development.
The book is divided into 7 chapters as follows:
Chapter 1: Ancient Questions and a young science
Chapter 2: What children learn about people
Chapter 3: What children learn about things
Chapter 4: What children learn about language
Chapter 5: What scientists have learned about children's minds
Chapter 6: What scientists of learned snit children's brains
Chapter 7: Trailing clouds of glory
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on 3 September 2010
This little book is a fascinating insight into the minds of young children and I just wish I had known some of this stuff when my own children were born. I will be passing it on to sons and daughters in law. It is a bit deep scientifically in places but made me laugh in others.
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on 17 February 2000
An excellent book which destroys many myths about babies and young children and how they think and perceive the world and the people about them. It will be an invaluable help to anyone involved with babies and young children - parents, grandparents, teachers etc. The style of writing is a bit American-folksy at times and the odd prejudice appears (what do the authors have against Martin Buber?), but a truly fascinating and valuable book to those of us who are not behavioural psychologists.
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on 30 May 2010
This book gives a great insight in babies brain development - found it really interesting for my degree studies!
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on 19 May 2003
As a university educated mother I found 'How Babies Think' fascinating. The ideas carefully and articulately explained in the book have opened my eyes to the way my daughter is developing in front of me. Unlike a typical parenting book, the emphasis is on the mental process and placing this in context, rather than 'what your baby SHOULD be doing by X months'. I've recommended this book to many of my parent friends to help them understand their own young children.
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on 27 June 2010
An excellent text book for students doing early childhood qualifications. Easy to read but very informative about child development. A must for all childcare students.
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on 5 April 2000
This book takes as its main point that babies are like scientists: they brim with curiosity and experiment endlessly on things around them. Turn it around, and scientists are also like babies. Grasped that? Good. Now let�fs get to the part I bought it for, which was to learn the latest about babies�f cognitive abilities. Unfortunately the authors keep hammering away at their cherished main point. Just get on with it, please! In the end, I did learn some interesting things, but I felt it could all have been condensed into a couple of long articles in Time or Newsweek. It is all the more puzzling since the back of the book sports a long and detailed bibliography of scientific tomes.
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