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Customer reviews

4.1 out of 5 stars
77
4.1 out of 5 stars
The Natural Navigator
Format: Paperback|Change
Price:£12.38+ Free shipping with Amazon Prime


on 27 December 2012
As a regular hiker, I expected a lot from this book, hoping to improve some of the navigation skills that i learnt from survival books. How disappointing... If you're an armchair adventurer and never go hiking, then this book is for you as most of the "tips" are too theoretical to be used on the field.
The introduction (50 pages) is pure verbosity; not worth reading. Most chapters are common sense or widely-known tips (using a stick as a solar clock, spotting Ursa Major and the North Star...)
And the book does not always deal with navigation; sometimes, the authot digresses for 2 or 3 pages before relating the topic with navigation as such.
I put 2 stars because i learnt what i think to be a useful tip : pudlles can help us navigate.
Apart from that, do yourself a favor and go for a comprehensive book instead, such as John Wiseman's SAS survival handbook. You'll just have a few pages about navigation but they seem a lot more useful.
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on 23 April 2012
As a walker and as a sailor, navigation fascinates me. Buying this book was therefore a foregone conclusion as soon as I saw it reviewed.

The book has lived up to the promise of the review and the trial chapter. Quite a bit of what is in it I already knew in outline, but the good thing about the book is that it sets it all down in a logically developing framework, chapter by chapter. It also provides a really interesting narrative about how the techniques developed and how they have been employed in times past.

Well worth the money.
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on 5 April 2011
It's not bad, but...

1) If you've got half an interest in the subject, you know the sun/stars/weather stuff (50-60% of the book ?) already. Nice to read about the Polynesians.

2) If you're after the Ray Mears/Survival School level of detail, go on one of Gooley's courses or buy a book that's in a military/survival school style cover design. Gooley's giving little away in this book on details other than to say "it's strongly regional" (true and fair) and to give some tastes of different environments.

There appears to be a fashionable style nowadays to be a cherry-corduroy wearing buffoon, writing "whimsically of details that busier lives miss." Gooley clearly has some impressive personal achievements to his name so he won't be caught on the Pretor-Pinney hook, but Barry Lopez or Richard Bach he is not (as far as style and depth are concerned.) He's left plenty of room for a non-superficial, thoughtful book on this subject.

Y
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on 4 April 2015
A lot of waffle, very little practical advice, meandered and worked its way round a limited number of themes without really giving much useful information. It's not a book you could take out with you and has few 'how to' guides of things you could go out and do - which is what I was hoping. Lacked enough useful diagrams with the required detail. I came away from reading this having learned very little.
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on 13 February 2015
See much more in the outside world, it is like a new experience, so far I have been hooked and sometimes forget to switch off, not a complaint but it really does promote an active mind when walking. Amazing how much in the natural world you have missed over the years. Well balanced with ideas and examples of making the most out of the great outdoors.
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on 3 June 2014
To be honest I found it hard going reading it, many words that did not really help or convey information very well.
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on 27 January 2013
Said my husband. I got this as a gift as it looked interesting and a bit different. Well the hubby loves it keeps saying how its the most interesting book he has ever read. He loves the out doors and wanted to improve his navigation skills and apparently this does.
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on 4 May 2011
This is a well written and easily understood book. I found myself using the techniques straight away in everyday life - meaning I have become more aware of my surroundings. It's a great way to support/ supplement your ability to navigate using maps and gps etc.
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on 8 March 2010
Gooley has come up with a really new style of exploration - back to basics. If you like fresh air, then you will probably love this book as much as I did. So many different reasons, using the colour of puddles to find north, knowing why clouds don't move in the same way as the wind is blowing, understanding why the sky is blue...if you get lost on any foreign land with only a pair of trousers and your intelligence to hand, Gooley may well help you out of a big whole!!
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on 20 August 2016
Thoughtfully put together, a pleasure to read and lesson in observation and meaning to what you see! Country walks all the more enjoyable reading nature's signs. In the UK, for the most part we are too heavily populated and road developed to get seriously lost and out of touch of help, but practice these nature navigation skills here and take them on a real adventure to remote parts and this knowledge might well save your life, and perhaps as importantly act as confirmation that your more conventional aids are working as they should be (ì.è. nature's signs being the reliable reference!). A highly recommended read for those wanting a deeper connection with the wide world.
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