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on 28 July 2015
This is a story filled romp through the world of rock and roll, written by the bass player who ended up touring for a number of years with Pink Floyd and numerous other artists. There is a nice blend of humour and revelation, character descriptions and anecdotes. The reader is left with a sense that the author was a hard partying rock musician who eventually had to cash out of the lifestyle before it killed him, but he is able to look back on it and laugh at the escapades of the spoiled rock elite's behaviour observed first hand. I still chuckle at his story about Tina Turner telling him to play the bass part again during a studio session, because it does not sound quite right. 'How do you want it played, Ms Turner ?' 'Play it more purple.' To this day, he has no idea what that meant, but having played the part again the same way, Ms Turner approved that he had finally 'nailed' it. He contrasts this to Madonna handing out pages of critical analysis of each musician's handling of each track during sessions. Good fun to read!
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on 12 July 2017
What a hard life Guy Pratt has had or maybe not. To think he only got his first bass guitar as he wanted an electric guitar for his Christmas/birthday and he was going to be given an acoustic six string guitar. He asked for a bass instead knowing full well that a double bass would be much more expensive that an electric bass.

Prior to reading this I wasn't aware how many bands he has played for, just associating him with Pink Floyd. Guy gives the impression that David Gilmour tolerates him but it is fairly obvious that he is a talented bassist. This is just an example of his self-deprecating humour which shines throughout this entertaining autobiography. He has played with many greats and been all over the world both playing live and in recording studios.

On a final note, Simon Templar has lost some of his gloss for me.

Ray Smillie
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on 9 January 2017
Guy Pratt, apart from being an awesome bass player, is a gobby little geezer whose British sense humour and wit shines through the whole book. He's had an eventful life, selected parts of which he describes in an engaging way, even if the reader is not a seasoned muso. I absolutely loved this book and have since bough physical copies to give to my friends. I'll probably end up reading it again a couple of times.
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on 21 July 2013
This is a highly entertaining and hugely self-deprecating memoir by a rather fine bassist. [Try searching on youtube for Guy Pratt disco basslines to see him play]. He's played with Madonna, Chic, Michael Jackson, Jimmy Page and Pink Floyd amongst many others. He walks a good line between the respectful "I can't quite believe I'm playing with [insert rock or pop hero]" and exposing some of the worst foibles - particularly drink or drug induced - of the music industry. Doesn't seem to stop him enjoying them too.

If you love 80s, 90s music and/or play bass, you will enjoy this book. The Michael Jackson chapter - which I won't spoil - is laugh out loud funny.
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on 5 January 2016
Just saw this book, downloaded it and read it.
Compulsive reading it is. I hadn't Hurd much about guy pratt before I read the book but ended up fascinated by him and his musical exploits. Well written book and a must for Floyd fans.
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on 19 May 2016
What's not to like about Guy Pratt, this is a charming and often funny book. But more to the point, unlike a lot of Rock Star type autobiographies, this is actually a decent read. Coming hot on the heels of my reading Rick Wakeman's terrible boorish tome "Grumpy Old Rock Star" the prose style here was a breath of fresh air. Also kudos for that "Like a Prayer" prayer bass line.
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on 17 April 2018
A very easy and funny read, would recommend to any musician who enjoys a behind the scenes book.
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on 26 December 2013
Gutted to have missed the live shows - they must have been great fun based on the stories in the book. As a fellow bass player, Guy Pratt does just enough info on how he played some great bass lines on classic rock and pop in the eighties and nineties, and plenty of gossip on his time with those luminaries.

A highly entertaining read.
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on 22 February 2018
a great read, very Floyd orientated, but does go other places
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on 20 November 2014
Brill, bought a Bass, wifes not happy
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