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on 6 April 2007
I'm a huge fan of Rankin's books and like most who read one have read them all. It's always been a key point of the series that Rankin has aged his central character in real time and here we start to realise just how close we are to the end of the career of John Rebus.

I have to say that I think this is possibly the best in the series since Black and Blue, it benefits from being set in reality in this case Edinburgh during the G8 summit. Tony Blair is the prime minister etc only adds to being sucked into the book.

I like this aspect as Rankin makes mention of current music and TV culture even CSI gets a mention from Rebus.

This book is as much about Siobhan as it is about Rebus and we continue to see that Rankin will be able to continue this series even without the man who was the central character. One principle character is Edinburgh and the setting isn't going to change.

I don't want to give away the ending as like all the stories there is plenty of twists and turns but I like that with Rankin the crimes are always based on real reasons like money, love and revenge.

I usually read these books in a couple of days but this time I purposely read this slower savouring every word like the fine wine this book is with only one Rankin book a year and possibly only one more Rebus story to come it's going to be tough to find another series as good as this one has consistently been.
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on 19 November 2006
Ian Rankin has been in fine form of late. Having only discovered his work about 2 years ago I have been enthralled by every single book. The Black Book, A Question of Blood and Dead Souls were particularly good, but The Naming Of The Dead is probably my favourite of all so far. This is another book in the Inspector John Rebus series, but it focusses a great deal on Siobahn Clarke who may well become the focal point of forthcoming novels by Mr Rankin. This is fast paced and reads like an episode of the TV series '24'. Rankin has also taken to dropping in popular culture references like one would expect to find in a Nick Hornby novel. This makes it similar in style and pace to The Innocent Man by John Grisham. There are a number of top notch thrillers coming out in time for the Christmas rush, and The Naming Of The Dead is as good as any of them. If you're looking to buy a book for someone as a gift I would recommend starting them on one of Rankin's earlier efforts if they are unfamiliar with his work. For fans though this is a must have, and the sooner the better.
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on 30 November 2006
Ian Rankin is surely ahead of his fellow crime writers if only in the amount of books that he has written that are consistently of a high standard. This is Rankin's 16th Rebus book since 1988, an asthonishing amount by by anyone standards -- not mentioning the other books not featuring Rebus.

This latest edition in the Rebus series sees the Scottsman nearing retirement only for a mysterious set of murders to drag him back in to murky world of criminality -- all set against the backdrop of the G8 summit. This book sees Rankin and Rebus on top form, and Rankin, in particular, uses the G8 and the protest marches that surround it to great effect.

Considering that this is the penultimate Rebus novel it seems to me that Rankin is grooming Siobhan Clarke to succeed Rebus when the old man finally retires -- or worse. She is given a more central role, like the previous few books, and we are seeing new and interesting sides to her.

Quite how Rankin keeps such a high standard is beyond me, but be sure not to miss out on the latest Rebus books before the character is finally seen off.
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on 21 December 2006
It's ironic that The Naming of the Dead has come so late in the series, since some of the later novels in it -namely, The Falls and Fleshmarket Close- have been a little weaker than the rest, as if the series was running out of steam. But this latest installment truly is Ian Rankin at his brilliant best, weaving absolutely everything in to it which made Rebus so damned good in the first place - and Cafferty's back!

For me, this is one of Ian's most balanced pieces of writing: drama, incident, suspense, mystery, political comment and intrigue, musical trivia and very sharp observation - it's all there in the right doses to keep you hooked from start to finish. Set against the G8 summit, Rebus is on the hunt for a serial killer who's been bumping off convicted rapists. He's been kept well away from the summit but it doesn't stop him from making that brilliant nuisance he does of himself and rubbing the right people up the wrong way !!

I think i've made myself clear enough. I simply loved this book!
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on 12 November 2006
I'm a huge fan of Rankin's books and like most who read one have read them all. It's always been a key point of the series that Rankin has aged his central character in real time and here we start to realise just how close we are to the end of the career of John Rebus.

I have to say that I think this is possibly the best in the series since Black and Blue, it benefits from being set in reality in this case Edinburgh during the G8 summit. Tony Blair is the prime minister etc only adds to being sucked into the book.

I like this aspect as Rankin makes mention of current music and TV culture even CSI gets a mention from Rebus.

This book is as much about Siobhan as it is about Rebus and we continue to see that Rankin will be able to continue this series even without the man who was the central character. One principle character is Edinburgh and the setting isn't going to change.

I don't want to give away the ending as like all the stories there is plenty of twists and turns but I like that with Rankin the crimes are always based on real reasons like money, love and revenge.

I usually read these books in a couple of days but this time I purposely read this slower savouring every word like the fine wine this book is with only one Rankin book a year and possibly only one more Rebus story to come it's going to be tough to find another series as good as this one has consistently been.
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The book is set in Scotland in July 2005, when one of the most important events in modern history is due to take place. The G8 summit, a meeting attended by some of the world's most powerful men. Virtually every day there is some form of demonstration or protest and the thin blue line is stretched to its limits.

Detective Inspector Rebus has been sidelined, until an MP's apparent suicide coincides with clues that a serial killer may be on the loose. The powers that be are keen to keep the lid on both the suicide and the possibility of a killer on the loose. They would not make good headline reading while such important people are around and the possibility of overshadowing such an important meeting does not bear thinking about. But they have not taken into account the fact that Rebus has never been one to stick too closely to the rule book.

When a colleague of Rebus, Siobhan Clarke becomes involved in finding the identity of the riot policeman who assaulted her mother, it looks as though both of them may be involved against both sides in the conflict.
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on 29 April 2016
I'm working my way through the Rebus series, and I have to admit that I love the stories, and the setting. No problems there. The problem I do have, and this is pretty much universal in books written by men that include female characters, is that the women are just so unbelievable! My daughter tells me that there are women who are "fixers", that is, they are attracted to men with problems in the hope of sorting them out. That's the only reason that any woman could conceivably decide to have a relationship with Rebus, in my view, especially as he gets older. Men despise women who "let themselves go" (i.e. get older and less "fit"), but can't see why women wouldn't be attracted to an elderly alcoholic with issues - bit unfair, I feel.

Siobhan's relationship with her parents seems very contrived. They're only my age (64 or thereabouts), for goodness sake. We do stuff. We know about stuff. Teenagers might think we're old fogies, but a woman of Siobhan's age should know better. And there's that endless thing about "My parents were terrible, they ruined my life, they're so lame, etc., etc.". Boring, and not worthy of Siobhan - she's becoming a female Rebus, and that's not good.

I will finish the series, and I'm sure I'll enjoy it, but I am beginning to get irritated. Stick to the crimes, and exploring Rebus's mind, though, it works better that way.
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The book is set in Scotland in July 2005, when one of the most important events in modern history is due to take place. The G8 summit, a meeting attended by some of the world's most powerful men. Virtually every day there is some form of demonstration or protest and the thin blue line is stretched to its limits.

Detective Inspector Rebus has been sidelined, until an MP's apparent suicide coincides with clues that a serial killer may be on the loose. The powers that be are keen to keep the lid on both the suicide and the possibility of a killer on the loose. They would not make good headline reading while such important people are around and the possibility of overshadowing such an important meeting does not bear thinking about. But they have not taken into account the fact that Rebus has never been one to stick too closely to the rule book.

When a colleague of Rebus, Siobhan Clarke becomes involved in finding the identity of the riot policeman who assaulted her mother, it looks as though both of them may be involved against both sides in the conflict.
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on 20 December 2006
While some may not rate this as their favourite Rebus book. I find that as I read each new novel in the series I get to know the characters better, and for that reason this ranks as my favourite so far. It's only a shame that there is to be only one more book in the series before John Rebus retires.

I come from Edinburgh and although I wasn't there during the G8 summit, The Naming of the Dead captures the spirit so effectively I can relive the moment as though it happened right before my eyes. Such is the power of Rankin's writing. Even though Rebus is to retire Edinburgh will continue to feature as the long running character throughout the Siobhan books to follow (and I'm sure Rebus will pop up from time to time.)

The pace of this book is a lot faster than previous Rebus outings, and it is very hard to put down. Be warned. Oh, and there's a delightful little twist at the end that kept me smiling for the rest of the day.
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on 28 October 2006
Ian Rankin never disappoints, "the naming of the dead" is no exception. John Rebus has to deal with a serial killer at the time of the G8 summit in Edinborough. Siobhan is back, so is Big Ger. All the ingredients for a great mystery. Anybody that has read the Rebus' series will appreciate that Ian Rankin is just getting better and better. He is my absolute favorite writer and I always feel disappointed when I finished another Rebus because I know it's going to be a long wait until the next one!
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